Coppelius


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Coppelius

destroys Olympia because of bad check. [Fr. Opera: Offenbach, Tales of Hoffmann, Westerman, 275]
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We follow the adventures of old Dr Coppelius and his prized doll, and the two lovers, Swanhilda and Franz, on an enchanting evening of mischief, frivolity and a lovers' tiff.
Franz is drugged and old Coppelius, gulled by Swanilda into believing his beautiful doll has come to life, is left broken-hearten.
Things do not end well as the two inventors quarrel and during the commotion Hoffmann's glasses are broken, Coppelius tears the doll apart and the guests mock Hoffman for falling in love with a machine.
The eccentric Dr Coppelius has crafted a dancing doll, which is so beautiful that a villager named Franz becomes infatuated with it and sets aside the love of his life Swanhilda.
Coppelius as they are brought to life by sparkling choreography and the animated score of Delibes.
It tells the story of a young man who falls in love with a life-size doll created by an eccentric inventor, Dr Coppelius.
Dr Coppelius creates a life-sized doll and calls her Coppelia.
Every gesture, especially during the dynamic second act, was on point, with the slightest nod from zany Dr Coppelius or the fidelity-challenged Franz (Daniil Simkin) evoking an audience reaction in every row of the Emirates Palace auditorium.
Coppelia is a beautiful mechanical doll created by Dr Coppelius, which rouses the affections of Franz, who is engaged to Swanilda.
Overall, the chorus is a real standout, as is baritone Laurent Naomi in his multirole casting as the various forces of evil: Lindorf, Coppelius, Docteur Miracle and Dapertutto.
Hoffmann's story where Nathaniel becomes afraid of his father's friend Coppelius who suddenly seizes him one night and is about to take out his eyes lest his father should intercede at the last moment and save him.