Lycaenidae

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Lycaenidae

[lī′sēn·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
A family of heteroneuran lepidopteran insects in the superfamily Papilionoidea including blue, gossamer, hairstreak, copper, and metalmark butterflies.

Lycaenidae

 

a family of diurnal butterflies. Their wing-spread is 2 to 4 cm. In the male the wings are light blue, dark blue, green, or orange-red, sometimes with considerable glitter; the females’ wings are brown. Occasionally the wings are the same in both sexes. Underneath, the wings are grayish with rows of small eyelike spots. There are more than 2,500 species, of which up to 500 are found in the moderate latitudes of the northern hemisphere. Some 60 species are known in the European part of the USSR. The caterpillars feed on broad-leaved trees (Thecla), grassy Polygonaceae (Chrysophanus), or legumes (various Lycaenidae). In some species the caterpillars are carnivores, eating aphids and scale insects. Lycaenidae do not cause great damage to crops.

References in periodicals archive ?
The site is home to black bear and supports the bog copper butterfly and at least a dozen other species of plants, insects, and birds that are uncommon, rare, threatened, or endangered in the state.
Objectives: The project s overall objective is to restore the mosaic of wetland habitats in Eislek to improve the conservation status of the three target species, namely the violet copper butterfly and the bird species whinchat and red-backed shrike.
these are species protected by national legislation and also listed in the annexes of the Habitats and Birds directives): beaver (Castor fiber), otter (Lutra lutra), Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx), various amphibians and reptiles, the corncrake (Crex crex), crane (Grus grus), bittern (Botaurus stellaris) and the scarce large blue butterfly (Maculinea teleius) and large copper butterfly (Lycaena dispar); To reduce the pressure of urbanisation on the purchased land;To improve the hydrological condition of marshland areas within the park; To improve the effectiveness of ecological corridors within the park by eliminating strips of privately-owned land (often fenced).