intrauterine device

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intrauterine device

(IUD), variously shaped birth controlbirth control,
practice of contraception for the purpose of limiting reproduction. Methods of Birth Control

Male birth control methods include withdrawal of the male before ejaculation (the oldest contraceptive technique) and use of the condom, a rubber sheath
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 device, usually of plastic, which is inserted into the uterusuterus,
in most female mammals, hollow muscular organ in which the fetus develops and from which it is delivered at the end of pregnancy. The human uterus is pear-shaped and about 3 in. (7.
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 by a physician. The IUD may contain copper or levonorgestrel, a progestin (a hormone with progesteronelike effects; see progesteroneprogesterone
, female sex hormone that induces secretory changes in the lining of the uterus essential for successful implantation of a fertilized egg. A steroid, progesterone is secreted chiefly by the corpus luteum, a group of cells formed in the ovary after the follicle
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). Apparently the IUD creates a hostile environment for the fertilized egg.
References in periodicals archive ?
The injection can last up to 14 weeks, the implant for three years, the IUS for five years, and copper IUDs up to 10 years.
16) The group has also asserted that hormonal IUDs, copper IUDs, Plan B and ella are "abortion-inducing drugs that can terminate life.
Emergency contraception is available in the form of pills which should be taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex, and a copper IUD (inter-uterine device) which should be fitted in the womb within five days of intercourse.
The use of a copper IUD for those women exposed between 72 hours and seven days prior to seeking medical help has also been shown to be extremely effective in preventing pregnancy.
The copper IUD typically leads to heavier and longer periods during the first few months of use, and some women find it increases cramping.
In non-clinic settings, initiation of copper IUD use is further restricted for women with ovarian cancer, high risk of HIV or other STIs, HIV-positive status, or AIDS.
2/1,000 for both levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems and copper IUDs, and also demonstrates that both IUDs are equally safe, without a difference in perforation rates.
Carolyn Westhoff, professor of obstetrics and gynecology and of epidemiology, New York--Presbyterian Hospital/ Columbia University Medical Center, said she advises clinicians to inform women of any weight that the copper IUD is the most effective form of emergency contraception available.
The currently available LARC methods include intrauterine devices and systems (the copper IUD and the hormonal intrauterine systems Mirena and Skyla) and the contraceptive implant (Nexplanon).
The copper IUD is recommended as an effective method of emergency contraception when inserted 5 days after unprotected intercourse, ACOG now says, citing a documented pregnancy rate of 0.