Coptic Alphabet

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Coptic Alphabet

 

an alphabetic writing system created in the second and third centuriesA.D. by the Egyptians who translated the Bible from Greek into Coptic, since the complex and extremely specific Egyptian writing, which in many respects did not reflect real pronunciation and actually did not represent vowel sounds, was not suitable for translation. In the early centuries of the Common Era, Egyptian magical texts, in which it was important to fix the sound of words (especially in incantations), were written down with Greek letters, using Egyptian cursive symbols (demotic writing) for sounds absent in Greek.

The Coptic alphabet consists basically of 24 Greek letters and six to eight (different in the various dialects) demotic symbols. With the dying off of the Coptic language, the Coptic alphabet went out of daily use and survived only in religious texts.

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The research and documentary reveal fascinating details contained within the document as well as key sections translated from its ancient Coptic script.
For a commentary on the nature of these twelve books in Coptic script discovered In Egypt in the twentieth century, see MacRae, who writes in his introduction to "The Thunder, Perfect Mind" that it is "a revelation discourse delivered by a female revealer in the first person (containing) various exhortations to hear and reflect, and reproaches for failing to do so" (271).
The research and documentary will reveal fascinating details contained within the document as well as key sections translated from its ancient Coptic script.
The Smithsonian Channel has pushed backed the broadcast to an unspecified date, while further tests on the Coptic script are carried out, the BBC reported.