Corded Ware Culture

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Corded Ware Culture

 

a group of archaeological cultures of the late Aeneolithic period and the Bronze Age in Central and Eastern Europe and of the Neolithic period in Northern Europe. Among the common features shared by the cultures are the pottery, decorated with cord impressions or with hatching resembling cords, as well as polished perforated stone battle axes, (hence the alternate name of the Corded Ware culture—the Battle-ax culture). The cultures also have many differences, and therefore the question of whether they belong to a single ethnic group has yet to be resolved, although it is believed that their bearers were Indo-European tribes, ancestors of the Slavs, Germans, and Baits.

REFERENCE

Mongait, A. L. Arkheologiia Zapadnoi Evropy: Kamennyi vek. Moscow, 1973.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his study on Corded Ware pottery in Finland, Torsten Edgren discussed vegetable imprints on Corded Ware sherds found at the municipalities of Vehkalahti (nowadays part of Hamina) and Virolahti (Edgren 1970, 33, fpl.
The author considers whether they were affected by earlier networks associated with Corded Ware.
In some cemeteries and settlements with the Corded Ware of the eastern Baltic region dated to the end of the III--the beginning of the II millennium BC slate rings are present (Yanits 1952; Loze 1993), whereas on the settlements of Karelia and Finland dated to the second half of the III millennium BC this type is absent.
She cites recent evidence that late Corded Ware beakers are not antecedent to Bell Beakers but contemporary with them, and argues that the All-Over-Corded Beakers of the Rhineland were a response to a new vogue for maritime Beakers along the Atlantic facade.
in the village of Veibri on the border of Tartu town approximately 130 m west of a Corded Ware Culture settlement site (reg.
Compilation and analysis of radiocarbon dates from this period suggests an origin in the Rhine delta shortly before 2500 BC in a Corded Ware context (Lanting & van der Waals 1976).
This type, therefore, involves several ceramic types regarded as separate groups at the present time (in Estonia Late Combed Ware, Corded Ware, Early Textile Ceramics, Textile Ceramics).
Dolukhanov sees a broad zone of late Mesolithic interaction being broken up into increasingly heterogeneous regional 'cultures' at the Mesolithic/Neolithic transition, but returning to a broad pattern of interaction with the pan-regional Corded Ware horizon.
One approximately 4,500-year-old individual belonged to Estonia's Corded Ware culture.
Some obvious exceptions include, for example, the review by Wlodarczak (2009) of the Corded Ware dating methods, and the use of multivariate statistics in conjunction with radiocarbon data as a means of refining typochronological classifications.
Corded Ware was first recognized in Finland by Julius Ailio, who in his groundbreaking work on Finnish Stone Age called it 'Alastaro pottery' after Alastaro Kalamaki settlement site located in south-western Finland (Ailio 1909, 92 f.
These included migrations from both Western and Eastern Europe towards the end of the Stone Age, through expanding cultures such as the Bell Beaker and the Corded Ware (named after their pots).