Cordillera de Los Andes

Cordillera de Los Andes

 

often used as the name for the mountain range and continental divide of the Chilean-Argentinean Andes between 31° and 39° S lat. in South America.

In the northern part of the Cordillera de los Andes many peaks exceed 5,000-6,000 m (Mount Aconcagua, 6,960 m), but south of 35° latitude none exceed 4,000 m. The range is composed primarily of Mesozoic sedimentary and volcanic rocks with intrusions. South of 33° latitude the western slopes have many active volcanoes, and earthquakes are frequent. As a result of the increasingly great precipitation in the south (200-2,500 mm annually), the snow line drops from 4,900 m at 30° S lat. to 2,300 m at 39° S lat. A desert landscape gives way to a water-eroded and glacial one. In the north the western slopes are covered with drought-resistant scrub; in the central regions, with sclerophyllous forests; and in the south, with humid evergreen forests that extend to the eastern slopes. The eastern slopes are arid as far as 36° S lat. Sometimes the whole western cordillera of the Andes, as well as the section between 20°30’ and 23° S lat. (as far as the volcano Llullaillaco) in the central Andes, is referred to as the Cordillera de los Andes.

References in periodicals archive ?
5 millones de habitantes y 440,831 millas cuadradas que se extiende desde el Caribe hasta el Pacifico y donde nace la Cordillera de los Andes.
The Cordillera del Condor is a massif in the southeastern foothills of the Cordillera de los Andes, on the 320 km Amazonian border between Ecuador and Peru.
Located in the southern part of South America, Chile is 3,000 miles long, bordered on one side by Cordillera de Los Andes, one of the highest and longest mountain ranges in the world and on the other side by the Pacific Ocean.