Coriolanus


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Coriolanus

(Gnaeus Marcius Coriolanus) (kôr'ēəlā`nəs), Roman patrician. He is said to have derived his name from the capture of the Volscian city Corioli. According to legend he was expelled from Rome because he demanded the abolition of the people's tribunate in return for distributing state grain to the starving plebeians. He joined the Volscians and led (491? B.C.) them in an attack on Rome. Only the tears of his wife and his mother caused him to spare the city. The angry and frustrated Volscians put him to death. Plutarch tells the story, and Shakespeare's Coriolanus is based on Plutarch.

Coriolanus

class-conscious and contemptuous leader. [Br. Lit.: Coriolanus]

Coriolanus

stiff-necked Roman aristocrat; contemptuous of the common people. [Br. Lit.: Coriolanus]

Coriolanus

Gaius Marcius . 5th century bc, a legendary Roman general, who allegedly led an army against Rome but was dissuaded from conquering it by his mother and wife
References in periodicals archive ?
50pm; NT Live Encore Screening: Coriolanus (12A) Thu 7pm; Pixels (12A) Fri-Thu 10am (Sat/Sun), 3pm; Royal Ballet Live: Romeo And Juliet () Tue 7.
The second common perspective on Coriolanus adopts an historicist view: a number of scholars who resist the dominant psychoanalytic treatments of the play find that excessive attention to Coriolanus's interiority and sexuality obscures pertinent socioeconomic concerns.
In war-ridden Rome, former soldier and hero Coriolanus (Fiennes) is banished , siding with his sworn enemy, Tullus Aufidius (Gerard Butler) to take revenge on his city.
It's a chaotic mythical world in which Vikings speak in Scottish accents - hence the presence of Coriolanus bad boy Gerard Butler.
While these dates immediately resonate for their political overtones, Sachs reminds us that they have important cultural ramifications as well: 1789 was the year that John Philip Kemble debuted his production of Coriolanus with himself in what quickly became his signature role, and in 1832 Thomas de Quincey published the first of his important essays on the Caesars in Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine.
The topics he discusses include the idea of the crowd in Shakespeare's time, class conflict and crowd psychology in the second part of Henry VI, from the body politic to the many-headed monster in Coriolanus, the circulation of fear in Richard III, and rumor and skepticism in Othello.
Ralph Fiennes' film adaptation of Coriolanus, now out on DVD, marries Shakespeare's dialogue to a 21st-century setting to retell the story of the Roman general Caius Marcius, nicknamed Coriolanus for his valor during a siege of the city of Corioli.
The hero, Gaius Marcius, later surnamed Coriolanus, is the consummate warrior but cannot make the transition from martial to political leader.
Caius Martius (Fiennes) is a general in the army of the Roman Republic, whose notable successes in battle win him the honorific title Coriolanus, and sway the senate to appoint him consul -- an executive office that eventually mutated into that of emperor, putting an end to Rome's republic.
Even for those who'd rather run a mile than watch the Bard's plays, Coriolanus is utterly gripping, action-packed and brimming with emotion.
RARELY performed even today, Coriolanus remains one of Shakespeare's least understood and most brutal plays.