Coriolis effect


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Coriolis effect: Coriolis force

Coriolis effect

(kôr'ē-ō`lĭs) [for G.-G. de Coriolis, a French mathematician], tendency for any moving body on or above the earth's surface, e.g., an ocean current or an artillery round, to drift sideways from its course because of the earth's rotation. In the Northern Hemisphere the deflection is to the right of the motion; in the Southern Hemisphere it is to the left. The Coriolis deflection of a body moving toward the north or south results from the fact that the earth's surface is rotating eastward at greater speed near the equator than near the poles, since a point on the equator traces out a larger circle per day than a point on another latitude nearer either pole. A body traveling toward the equator with the slower rotational speed of higher latitudes tends to fall behind or veer to the west relative to the more rapidly rotating earth below it at lower latitudes. Similarly, a body traveling toward either pole veers eastward because it retains the greater eastward rotational speed of the lower latitudes as it passes over the more slowly rotating earth closer to the pole. It is extremely important to account for the Coriolis effect when considering projectile trajectories, terrestrial wind systems, and ocean currents.

Coriolis effect

[kȯr·ē′ō·ləs i′fekt]
(mechanics)
Also known as Coriolis deflection.
The deflection relative to the earth's surface of any object moving above the earth, caused by the Coriolis force; an object moving horizontally is deflected to the right in the Northern Hemisphere, to the left in the Southern.
The effect of the Coriolis force in any rotating system.
(physiology)
The physiological effects (nausea, vertigo, dizziness, and so on) felt by a person moving radially in a rotating system, as a rotating space station.

Coriolis effect

Coriolis effectclick for a larger image
Coriolis effect
Displacement of the vertical caused by random acceleration.
i. The apparent effect of a number of forces that act upon a body or particle set in motion on the earth's surface, tending to divert the moving object to the right of its path in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. A correction must be made when navigation relative to the earth is considered. See Coriolis force.
ii. The change in rotor blade velocity to compensate for a change in the distance between the center of mass of the rotor blade and the axis of rotation of the blade as the blades flap in flight. Rotor blades accelerate when their center of gravity moves closer to the center of rotation and decelerate when it moves farther away. Rotor blades accelerate and decelerate accompanied with the rotor blades flapping.
iii. The displacement of the apparent horizon, as defined by the bubble in a sextant by acceleration, caused by an aircraft flying in a nonlinear path in space.
iv. The tendency of a mass to increase or decrease its angular velocity when its radius of rotation is changed. More correctly called the conservation of angular momentum.
References in periodicals archive ?
And while inside 1,000 yards you've got to be a most accomplished shooter with an extremely accurate rifle to recognize Coriolis Effect in your shot placement, it's still worth knowing--if nothing else because it's an interesting aspect of rifle shooting.
The depressions are filled from all sides, and air currents are deflected to the right by the Coriolis effect.
The Coriolis effect increases in a polewards direction.
Earth is so large that under ordinary circumstances, we don't move north or south fast enough for the Coriolis effect to come into significant play.
They gauge flow via the coriolis effect, which is the tendency of the earth's rotation to deflect a body from its course of motion.
EXAC application engineer Paul Thompson said his company's products are differentiated by the fact that they use an oscillation frequency that is very close to that of the Coriolis effect.
Coriolis effect extraction is key to the design of rotational MEMS components such as gyroscopes or angular rate sensors used for platform stabilization (for example in automotive applications and for video camera image stabilization) and navigation systems, as in GPS (global positioning systems).
The Coriolis effect was first documented in 1835 by French mathematician Gaspard-Gustave de Coriolis.
One passage describes the author's amazement at witnessing the Coriolis effect in a ship's toilet.
Presumably, the Coriolis effect keeps the bubble moving to the right in the Purdue labs and to the left in the Australian labs.
In fact, efforts have been made to present a mathematical method by studying Coriolis effects in structures with very high rotating speed.
The increase in Coriolis effects is due to the lowering of the Fermi level, then these effects depress the odd spin states relative to the even spin states.