Coriolis force


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Coriolis force

(kor-ee-oh -liss, ko-ree-) A concept introduced to simplify calculations on the motion of bodies observed from a rotating frame of reference, such as the Earth. The effect of the Coriolis force is to deflect the object in a direction perpendicular to its course.

Coriolis Force

 

(named after the French scientist G. Coriolis), one of the inertia forces introduced to account for the effect of a rotating frame of reference on the relative motion of a material point. The Coriolis force is equal to the product of the mass of the point by its Coriolis acceleration and is directed opposite to this acceleration.

The effect accounted for by the Coriolis force is such that in a rotating frame of reference a point moving not parallel to the axis of this rotation either is deflected in the direction perpendicular to its relative velocity or exerts pressure on the body obstructing such motion. On the earth, this effect is governed by the planet’s rotation and consists in the fact that a free-falling body is deflected from the vertical to the east (to the first approximation), while bodies moving along the earth’s surface in the direction of the meridian are deflected from their direction of motion to the right in the northern hemisphere and to the left in the southern hemisphere. These deflections are extremely small owing to the slow rotation of the earth and are noticeable only at great velocities of motion (as in the case of rockets or long-range artillery shells) or when the motion is of great duration (for example, the erosion of the corresponding river banks [seeBAER’S LAW] or the formation of certain air and sea currents).

In engineering, Coriolis forces are taken into account in the theory of gyroscopes and turbines.

S. M. TARG

Coriolis force

[kȯr·ē′ō·ləs ‚fȯrs]
(mechanics)
A velocity-dependent pseudoforce in a reference frame which is rotating with respect to an inertial reference frame; it is equal and opposite to the product of the mass of the particle on which the force acts and its Coriolis acceleration.

Coriolis force

Coriolis forceclick for a larger image
In the Northern Hemisphere the Coriolis force deflects the winds toward right.
An apparent force experienced by a body moving relative to the rotating earth. The wind blowing from the poles toward the equator turns to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere because of this Coriolis force, or Coriolis effect. Strictly, Coriolis force is a force that acts on a particle while it is moving along a path in a rotating plane.. Named after Gaspard Gustave de Coriolis (1792–1843).
References in periodicals archive ?
It initially flows north-to-south in the northern hemisphere, but eventually turns right from the Coriolis Force and becomes more of a northeast and east wind.
For most fishermen, factoring the potential effects of Coriolis force and rebound currents provides a new view of the real world of walleyes.
The predominant offset of modern valleys in relation to Neogene ones on the Volga-Kama rivers is the right-hand shift, related to the impact of the Coriolis force on the watercourse.
The Coriolis force (Fc) is generated by the inertia of the fluid particles accelerated between points AC and of those decelerated between points CB.
One of the main purposes of the present work is to see the effects of inertia, centripetal and Coriolis forces on the dynamic response.
To take into account convection and the Coriolis force term we suggest to use:
This is called the Coriolis force and is caused by the earth spinning.
But if certain types of vortices persist, dust and gas would get pushed to the center by the so-called Coriolis force, an effect of the whirling motion.
Now they call out in cackling chaotic rattles, as when a drinking straw sucks the bottom or the last bath water whirls to the Coriolis force.
The Coriolis force in the Northern hemisphere turns everything to the right, including this belt of air.
From the simplest theory of the yam unwinding which doesn't take into account the air drag nor the Coriolis force, we know that the tension is proportional to the angular velocity squared
As the fluid accelerates away from the center, a resultant Coriolis force opposes the motion.