Corispermum

Corispermum

 

a genus of plants of the Chenopodiaceae family. They are annual, mostly short, ramose grasses with linear leaves, small unattractive axillary flowers, and flat, often alate, fruits. There are about 60 species which grow wild in Eurasia; there are only a few species in North America. In the USSR about 30 species grow along the sands and banks of rivers and, more rarely, along the shores of lakes and seas in the European USSR (chiefly in the south and southeast), the Caucasus, Siberia, Middle Asia, and the Far East. Some species of Corispermum are good fodder for camels, sheep, and goats. C. declinatum grows as a weed in the Trans-Volga Region and Siberia.

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2009) examined the reproductive effort of an annual plant Corispermum elongatum Bunge in two types of sandy habitats and found significant effect on the pattern of reproductive allocation.
2009) who found greater reproductive effort of Corispermum elongatum growing on fixed or stabilized dunes compared to that on mobile or embryonic dunes.
During summer, their ration consisted of Corispermum sp (28.
Among them Corispermum sp, Seriphidium santolinum, Artemisia desertorum and Horaninowia ulicina were the primary food sources, with Horaninowia ulicina and Salsola paulsenii noted in the diet only in summer.
poaeoides, Sonchus arvensis, Corispermum Scorzonera mongolica, patelliforme Euphorbia humifusa S(H) (A) 20(21) 9(19) AGB (B) 3.
C] yr BP (TO-292) at the Mayo Indian Village (MIV) site along the Stewart River in central Yukon Territory are dominated by diverse tundra herbs, including Corispermum hyssopifolium, Bupleurum americanum, Potentilla, Dryas, Papaver, several Caryophyllaceae, and shrubs (Salix, Betula glandulosa), suggesting a cold and dry tundra environment (Matthews et al.
1997 29600[+ or -]300 Corispermum Mayo Indian Matthews et al.
Flour and bran are not only obtained from grasses but from other desert plants such as Agriophyllum pungens, Corispermum mongolicum, and other chenopods, and sometimes from the seed of artemisias such as Artemisia annua.
In studies of other dune species (Ammophila breviligulata, Cakile edentula, Cirsium rhothophilum, Corispermum hyssopifolium and Elymus canadensis), seeds of all plants required burial for successful seed germi nation (Zedler et al,, 1983; Maun and Lapierre, 1986).