Corpora Allata

Corpora Allata

 

glands of internal secretion in insects. Corpora allata are a pair of small, compact glandular organs covered with connective-tissue membrane. They are modified coelomoducts of the maxillary segment of the head and are located behind the brain above the fore-intestine. The function of the corpora allata is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system. They elaborate juvenile hormone, which prevents conversion of the larva to a pupa and to an adult insect and stimulates growth and development of larval organs. In the final larval stage, the action of juvenile hormone gradually diminishes. This is because its concentration in the blood decreases, since the growth of the larval body exceeds that of the corpora allata. Removal of the corpora allata in a larva causes premature metamorphosis into a miniature adult individual. In adult insects the hormone of the corpora allata stimulates maturation of the sex cells.

REFERENCE

See references under INSECTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Siva-Jothy and Rolff permitted some of their beetles to mate, then transferred the insects' corpora allata to virgin beetles.
When virgins received corpora allata from mated beetles, their phenoloxidase activity dropped--about a fifth for males and a half for females--compared with virgins receiving transplants from unmated donors.
The researchers did a second round of transplants, this time treating some of the mated beetles' corpora allata with a compound that blocks the production of juvenile hormone.