Raider

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Related to Corporate raider: hostile takeover

Raider

 

a military ship or armed merchant vessel that carries on independent combat actions on sea- or ocean-lanes to destroy enemy military transports and merchant vessels.

During World War I, Germany used cruisers as raiders, including some auxiliary cruisers camouflaged as neutral merchant vessels. Early in World War II, fascist Germany used the battleship Bismarck and three pocket battleships and cruisers as raiders.

References in periodicals archive ?
It may be wonderful to be a bold corporate raider or to lead the detached life of a contemplative monk, but it would be ludicrous to switch between these on alternate Tuesdays.
Today, it is perfectly respectable to suggest that Bush and his buddies are a new breed of nation raider, after the model of the corporate raider, scamming the nation first with deregulation of energy, then with huge contracts awarded after the Iraqi invasion in a closed-bid giveaway to the insider corporations for which many of Bush's men have consulted.
After the company was acquired, the corporate raider would staff to take it apart.
Danone and even Cadbury Schweppes joined American corporate raider Carl Icahn and Philip Morris in tabling bids for Nabisco.
Corporate raider financier Carl Icahn, who came to prominence in the 1980s by purchasing stakes in undervalued companies in turmoil, has issued a filing with the Federal Trade Commission to purchase a significant stake in the struggling J.
Campbell is a hobby trainer-breeder and stands Corporate Raider, Machine Gun Tom's sire, at his Bellbridge Stud in Perth.
The Post's coverage of Buffett, a corporate raider now ranked as the country's second-richest man, has been effusive.
Under the facts of the TAM, amounts paid by a target to repurchase its stock from a corporate raider had to be capitalized.
This prohibition leaves the corporation at a distinct disadvantage during hostile takeovers because a corporate raider may raise funds and deduct loan fees to purchase a target's stock, while the target may not.
The most notorious example of the new market for the Adirondacks' deep woods was the sale of 96,000 acres, sight unseen, acquired from a British corporate raider named James Goldsmith by Henry Lassiter, an Atlanta developer, for $17 million.
The legendary corporate raider made headlines recently with his offer to buy Mentor Graphics Corp, less than a week after Dynegy, Inc.
MPs are to grill a corporate raider behind a controversial PS7.

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