corporatism

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corporatism

  1. as in Spain under Franco and more generally in association with FASCISM, the state control of major ‘corporations’ (e.g. labour organizations), with the aim of removing or suppressing social conflict, fostering nationalism, etc.
  2. relations between government and key interest groups (see PRESSURE GROUPS), especially big business and TRADE UNIONS, involving:
  1. intermediation – bodies standing between the state and the individual citizen negotiate agreements with the government on behalf of their members (e.g. agreements on wages and prices);
  2. incorporation – the possession of a special status by these organizations (e.g. in the UK the CBI or the TUC), so that, in some respects, they become virtual extensions of government, what Middlemas, Politics in an Industrial Society, (1979) calls ‘governing institutions’. The UK is often regarded as having moved in a corporatist direction in this second sense in the period 1960 to 1979, a tendency which was reversed with the election of the Thatcher government in 1979. Modern Austria is some times advanced as a more fully developed example of corporatism in sense 2 , characterized by features lacking in the UK, including wide social agreement on the value of social partnership, compulsory membership of trade unions and employers organizations, and effective cooperation between capital and labour.
In a more general sense, ‘intermediate organizations’, and thus ‘corporatist’ social structures, were advanced as a solution to modern social ills by DURKHEIM. Corporatism is often regarded as one of the ways in which governments intervene to manage ADVANCED CAPITALISM. However, in the UK and elsewhere corporatism has been undermined by crises of accumulation and a reversal of consensus politics.

See FISCAL CRISIS IN THE CAPITALIST STATE, HABERMAS; see also SECTORAL CLEAVAGES.

References in periodicals archive ?
Eventually, appealing already to certain educated classes who had remained a little reserved came the prestige of the political leader, the organizer of the constitution and the corporativist regime.
It is no surprise, then, that an ethically principled (and occasionally overreaching) functionalist like Gaetano Ciocca would thrive on plans for guided roadways and railways with propeller-driven vehicles, even as he attempted to realize the goals of a corporativist "third way" between capitalism and communism, between public and private sectors.
The proposal leaves the corporativist unions untouchable.
Between the anthropological and corporativist senses of "the global," there are no doubt many connections, some of which have begun to surface in art and art talk.
When labour was finally incorporated (following growing mobilization of urban workers during World War II) it was under the auspices of a right-wing nationalist, corporativist regime.
The central message of this long, and at times tedious, book is that the economic crisis afflicting Argentina is the product of a corporativist system that, over the years, has burdened the economy with excessive regulations, as well as misguided and self-serving policies.
The PRI's corporativist control over labor unions and peasant organizations amounts to little more than company unionism, with big payoffs for corrupt labor bosses.
The success of the 2010 electoral backlash against Obama affirmed ALEC's localism strategy, giving momentum to a host of corporativist coups d'etat, from Republican union-busting opposition to collective bargaining in Wisconsin, to reactionary anti-immigration laws in Arizona and Alabama, to the wholesale takeover of local governments in Michigan, to an onslaught of anti-voting rights legislation passed in more than half the states in the Union leading up to the 2012 election.
As Baldoli elaborates in the following chapter, "Toward a Corporativist Community: the Fasci italiani all'estero in Britain, 1935-37," the new agenda of Fascism included preparing for war against Britain, now considered the true enemy (67).