corridor

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corridor

1. a hallway or passage connecting parts of a building
2. a strip of land or airspace along the route of a road or river
3. a strip of land or airspace that affords access, either from a landlocked country to the sea (such as the Polish corridor, 1919-39, which divided Germany) or from a state to an exclave (such as the Berlin corridor, 1945--90, which passed through the former East Germany)
4. a passageway connecting the compartments of a railway coach
5. corridors of power the higher echelons of government, the Civil Service, etc., considered as the location of power and influence
6. a flight path that affords safe access for intruding aircraft

Corridor

A narrow passageway or gallery connecting several rooms or apartments within a residence, school, hospital, office building or other structure.

What does it mean when you dream about a corridor?

Symbol of transition; going from one situation to something different. Alternatively, a corridor can represent a route to one’s unconscious mind. In psychoanalysis, a womb symbol. (See also Hallway).

corridor

[′kär·ə·dər]
(ecology)
A land bridge that allows free migration of fauna in both directions.

corridor

1. A long interior passageway providing access to several rooms.
2. A public means of access from several rooms or spaces to an exit.
3. An enclosed passageway that limits the means of egress to a single path of travel. Also see exit, passageway.

corridor

corridor
i. A ‘hole' with defined boundaries, through the terminal control area designated Class B Airspace, in which aircraft may operate without an ATC (air traffic control) clearance or communication with air traffic control.
ii. A safe path variably for either a low-level penetration that is relatively free of obstructions or a path in which enemy radar cover is least or is relatively safe from enemy defenses. Also, a path through which certain types of traffic are permitted.
iii. A restricted air route specified for use by friendly aircraft and established for the purpose of preventing friendly aircraft from being fired on by friendly forces.
References in classic literature ?
Leaving the basement story of the house, which was entirely devoted to the servants' offices, they ascended to the first floor, and entered the long corridor, with which Magdalen's last night's experience had already made her acquainted.
Everywhere in the halls and corridors cloth was laid down so that no footstep could be heard, and everything was still--very, very still.
He strolled into the corridor again, expecting to meet him, and when he was within a few yards of Mademoiselle Nioche's box saw his friend pass out, accompanied by the young man who had been seated beside its fair occupant.
Like well-schooled terriers, they paced the corridors with us, but I could not help but note the lathering jowls, nor the hungry expressions with which they eyed Tars Tarkas and myself.
With a gesture I silenced him, and together we drew aside into another corridor a few paces farther on.
They walked out of the museum into a long, dark corridor, with the walls painted in two shades of red, and other youths walking along suggested the way to them.
Together we repaired to the first tier of corridors beneath the main floor of the buildings, and here Perry and Ghak halted to await me.
Along this Werper made his way, ascending a flight of stone steps to another corridor twenty feet above the level of the first.
She opened her eyes to see that they were in a corridor dimly lighted by gratings set in its roof--a winding corridor, water filled from wall to wall.
As they spoke the girl was making her way through the aperture after Ghek, and presently all three had quitted the apartments of Luud and were moving rapidly along the winding corridors toward the tower.
Already I had traversed several hundred yards of it, from many points of which other corridors diverged.
The hyenas fell in behind as the witch-doctor set off toward the cave, and through the long black corridors they followed as Bukawai bore his victim into the bowels of the hills.