corset

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corset,

article of dress designed to support or modify the figure. Greek and Roman women sometimes wrapped broad bands about the body. In the Middle Ages a short, close-fitting, laced outer bodice or waist was worn. By the 16th cent. it had become a tight inner bodice, sometimes of leather, stiffened with whalebone, wooden splints, or steel; fashion demanded the slenderest possible waist in contrast with the enormous farthingales and stuffed breeches that were worn. Stays and tight lacing were made for both men and women from the 17th through the 19th cent., except for a brief period following the French Revolution. By 1900 the corset had become primarily a female garment, and it was gradually modified to conform to the natural lines of the body.

Corset

 

a broad belt that is worn tightly around the thorax and waist. It is an article of women’s clothing. In medicine, orthopedic corsets are used to correct curvature of the spine and spinal injuries. Corsets are meant to restrict movement of the spine, to relieve pressure on the spine, and to correct deformities. A corset can be stiff, semistiff, or soft and elastic. As a rule, corsets are made from a plaster cast taken from the patient; they are made out of leather, gelatin glue, aluminum, or fabric with metal or plastic bones.

The construction of the corset and the material from which it is made are determined by the location and character of the spinal injury. For injuries to the thoracic or cervical regions, the corsets are made with neck braces; corsets made for lumbar injuries only come up to the shoulder blades. For example, in cases of tuberculosis, stiff corsets are prescribed; for small spinal injuries, semistiff corsets; and for spinal curvatures, soft elastic corsets with busks made of plastic and flexible steel. A corset should be worn constantly only upon the advice of a physician.

V. L. ANDRIANOV and N. N. NEFED’EVA

References in periodicals archive ?
The meanings corsetry impressed upon w omen's bodies thus shifted with industrialization, as women's fears of aging, imperfect, inferior, unfashionable, and unscientific bodies replaced earlier fears of moral turpitude and questionable respectability.
Still fascinated by the corsetry theme, Rudeen entered one of her creations in the World of Wearable Arts awards, better known as WOW, in New Zealand, and won both the avant garde and people's choice awards for a circus-themed creation called The Ring Mistress.
Using the slogan "Own The Throne," the ad shows Katy as an 18th century Queen, clad in powdered wig and being dressed in corsetry and framed skirts by bustling servants.
In fairness to Holly, after two hours trussed up like that, she may have been feeling a little light-headed from all that corsetry.
For the show, she ate 30 courses a day while wearing whalebone corsetry.
I hope the income from my new business will pay for me and my daughter Ciara to do a dressmaking and corsetry course, that's what my goal is.
Annette stocks everything from bras starting at size 28A up to 40E, knickers, stocking, suspenders, corsetry and nightwear.
With that kind of quality in her genes, Corsetry could make a mockery of a mark of 74 before long, but at a presumably bigger price I prefer Petaluma.
The designs, which include corsetry, have been transformed into "more wearable" items for today's consumers.
Save the bondage bindings and lace-up corsetry for your naughtier costume parties and embrace the subtler side of this trend with suggestive sheer inserts, leather panels and black lace.
There were a lot of references to Victorian corsetry, the padded hip, the tiny cinched-in waist, and also to the arts and crafts movement with all of the hand-work on the lace of the dress and also the bustle inside to create the shape of the back of the dress.