pampas grass

(redirected from Cortaderia selloana)
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Related to Cortaderia selloana: pampas grass

pampas grass,

any species of the genus Cortaderia, tall South American plants of the family Gramineae (grassgrass,
any plant of the family Gramineae, an important and widely distributed group of vascular plants, having an extraordinary range of adaptation. Numbering approximately 600 genera and 9,000 species, the grasses form the climax vegetation (see ecology) in great areas of low
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 family) cultivated in warm climates for ornament. The common pampas grass (C. argentea or selloana) is a perennial with a cluster of long narrow drooping leaf blades. The male and female flowers are borne on separate plants; the ones which bear the female flowers have large, silvery, plumelike panicles which are sold for decorative purposes. Pampas grass is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Liliopsida, order Cyperales, family Gramineae.

pampas grass

any of various large grasses of the South American genus Cortaderia and related genera, widely cultivated for their large feathery silver-coloured flower branches
References in periodicals archive ?
Tall grasslands along the coast are mostly dominated by Cortaderia selloana (Poaceae).
As other, less brazen, grasses have increased in popularity in recent years, our long standing relationship with Cortaderia selloana (Pampas Grass) seems to have lessened and now we seldom see the bold specimens in the centres of front garden lawns, with their tall, elegant plumes of creamy white flowers, any more.
Cortaderia selloana `Sunningdale Silver' More commonly known as Pampass Grass, the silky, silvery-white or pink-flushed flower plumes are produced in late summer above large mounds of sharp-edged, mid-green leaves.
Grasslands of Cortaderia selloana are an important habitat for numerous insects, for example coleopterans, and particularly tussocks are an important source of larvae and adults of lepidopterans (Farina and Cicchino 2011).