Cádiz Cortes

(redirected from Cortes de Cadiz)

Cádiz Cortes

 

a constituent assembly in Spain during the Spanish Revolution of 1808-14. Convened on Sept. 24, 1810, on the island of León, it was transferred to Cádiz on Feb. 20, 1811, and sat until Sept. 20, 1813.

The Cortes adopted a number of important resolutions aimed at strengthening the revolution. In October 1810 it enacted a law establishing equality between Spaniards and Latin Americans and guaranteed freedom of speech and the press. In August 1811 a law was promulgated abolishing seignorial rights and privileges; and in February 1813 the Inquisition was abolished and laws directed against the religious orders adopted. The Cortes began to confiscate and sell church lands and abolished a number of taxes that had been imposed for the benefit of the church. Guilds and corporations of artisans were abolished, and free trade between Spain and its American colonies was established.

On the whole the legislation of the Cádiz Cortes embodied the chief demands of the bourgeois revolution. However, the Cortes was unable to take the lead in the struggle of the masses against the French occupation forces, which had invaded Spain in 1808, or against the forces of domestic reaction. The Cortes’ authority extended only to the small part of Spain free of foreign occupation. The Cortes could not bring itself to confiscate the land belonging to secular feudal owners and to distribute it among the peasants. The most important step taken by the Cádiz Cortes was the adoption of the Cádiz Constitution of 1812.

REFERENCES

Marx, K. Revoliutsionnaia Ispaniia. In K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 10.
Maiskii, I. M. Ispaniia, 1808-1917. Moscow, 1957.
Trachevskii, A. S. Ispaniia deviatnadtsatogo veka, part 1. Moscow, 1872.
References in periodicals archive ?
Manuel Chust, La Cuestion Nacional Americana En Las Cortes De Cadiz (1810-1814) (1999); Rafael Estrada Michel, Monarquia Y Nacion Entre Cadiz Y Nueva Espana: El Problema De La Articulacion Politica De Las Espanas Ante La Revolucion Liberal Y La Emancipacion Americana (2006); Rafael Estrada Michel, Los Reinos de Indias y la Nueva Nacion Espanola, 22 Anuario Mexicano De Historia Del Derecho 209-36 (2010); Ivana Frasquet, Las Caras Del Aguila; Del Liberalismo Gaditano A La Republica Federal Mexicana (1820-1824) (Universitat Jaume I) (2008); Eduardo Herrera, Los Origenes dei constitucionalismo en Iberoamerica, in America Y La Hispanidad: Historia De Un Fenomeno Cutural (Antonio Canellas ed.
Mirow, The Constitution of Cadiz in Florida, supra note 2; MARIE LAURE RIEUM1LLAN, LOS DIPUTADOS AMERICANOS EN LAS CORTES DE CADIZ (IGUALIDAD O INDEPENDENCIA) (1990); MARIO RODRIGUEZ, THE CADIZ EXPERIMENT IN CENTRAL AMERICA, 1808 TO 1826 (1978).
ACTAS DE LAS SESIONES SECRETAS DE LAS CORTES GENERALES EXTRAORDINARIAS DE LA NACION ESPANOLA 16 (1874); Tomas y Valiente, Estudio Preliminar, in ARGUELLES, DISCURSOS, supra note 41, at xxiii; see also Albert Derozier, Arguelles y la cuestion de America ante las Cortes de Cadiz de 1810-1814, HOMENAJE A NOEL SALOMON, ILUSTRACION ESPANIOLA E INDEPENDENCIA DE AMERICA 159-54 (Alberto Gil Movales ed.
While the Cortes de Cadiz adopted a law that shifted power from the King (who by tradition authorized publication of a text) to the individual author of the play, Ferdinand VII annulled the statute when he returned to the throne in May 1814.