Corvidae

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Corvidae

[′kȯr·və‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
A family of large birds in the order Passeriformes having stout, long beaks; includes the crows, jays, and magpies.

Corvidae

 

a family of birds of the order Passeriformes. The birds are of medium and large dimensions (up to 65 cm in length) with powerful beaks and claws. They have nostrils covered with trichoid feathers (adult rooks are an exception) and straight tails, which are either rounded or stepped. Some members of Corvidae (magpies, tropical magpies, and jays) have very long tails. The plumage is thick and in many species has a metallic luster. There are more than 100 species. They are distributed widely and found everywhere but Antarctica, New Zealand, and certain ocean islands. Their haunts are varied and include forests, steppes, deserts, mountains, and populated areas.

Usually members of Corvidae nest in separate pairs and less frequently in colonies. They are monogamous. They build their nests in trees or bushes, on rocks, and on the roofs of buildings. They lay three to eight speckled eggs once a year in early spring. Most species are roosting and migratory birds. They are omnivorous. Some members of Corvidae are useful as exterminators of murine rodents and harmful insects; others are harmful and damage crops (corn and sunflowers, for example) or destroy the eggs and fledglings of other birds. In the USSR there are 17 species, including the Alpine chough, raven, crow, jackdaw, rook, chough, Siberian jay, magpie, and jay.

REFERENCE

Ptitsy Sovetskogo Soiuza, vol. 5. Edited by G. P. Dement’ev and N. A. Gladkov. Moscow, 1954.

A. M. SUDILOVSKAIA

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First-order analysis shows three of the five corvid species, and flocks comprised of mixed species, exhibited highly significant axial alignment corresponding to the north-south magnetic axis (Table 1).
squirrel dreys, corvid or raptor constructions) may also possess some of these insulating properties (Pulliainen, 1973), as we observed nests being used during the winter season as well.
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In North America, corvid populations have increased and ranges have expanded into formerly unoccupied habitats (Restani and others 2001; Kelly and others 2002; Kristan and Boarman 2003; Marzluff and Neatherlin 2006), primarily aided by increased food supplements made available to these intelligent omnivores by humans (Marzluff and Angell 2005).
Marzluff JM and Neatherlin E (2006) Corvid response to human settlements and campgrounds: causes, consequences, and challenges for conservation.
The analysis even suggested they had a preference for dark feathers, which they selected from birds of prey and corvids - such as ravens and rooks.
Long-term spatial memory in four seed-caching corvid species.
Claws apparently had more value because the number of collected eggs dropped after 1897, and in 1909 the NEHS stopped financing corvid egg collecting altogether (Anonymous, 1909).
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Clark's Nutcracker (Nucifraga columbiana) was first reported from the area by Leopold (1947); a decade later Miller et at (1957) reported a second sighting of this corvid.