Cosmic Background Explorer


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Cosmic Background Explorer:

see infrared astronomyinfrared astronomy,
study of celestial objects by means of the infrared radiation they emit, in the wavelength range from about 1 micrometer to about 1 millimeter. All objects, from trees and buildings on the earth to distant galaxies, emit infrared (IR) radiation.
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Cosmic Background Explorer

See COBE.
References in periodicals archive ?
He provides an engaging, behind-the-scenes account of how WMAP, as well as its predecessor, the Cosmic Background Explorer, was built and launched and how data from each are processed.
Initiated with the Explorer 1 launch in 1958 that discovered the Earth's radiation belts and including the Cosmic Background Explorer mission that led to Nobel prizes for their investigators, the Explorer program has launched more than 90 missions.
Viewing the fluctuations with 45 times the sensitivity and 33 times the spatial resolution of its predecessor, the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite, WMAP has nailed down several key cosmological parameters.
Other programs have included the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS), the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) for the Hubble Space Telescope.
261), wherein Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) findings are surpassed by BOOMERANG (Balloon Observations of Millimeter Extragalactic Radiation and Geophysics) data, can you help me understand what happened to the Microwave Anistrophy Probe (MAP)?
In 1992, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite became the first detector to observe the tiny temperature fluctuations in the microwave background.
Ball Aerospace's collaboration with GSFC has resulted in a successful partnership on a wide range of programs including the Hubble Space Telescope, James Webb Space Telescope, the Operational Land Imager, the NPOESS Preparatory Project, QuickSCAT and ICESat, the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, and the Cosmic Background Explorer.
In 1991, the Cosmic Background Explorer first revealed fluctuations in the microwave background but averaged temperature variations over huge patches of sky.
The variations, a few ten-thousandths of a kelvin, were detected by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite.