risk

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risk

at risk
a. Social welfare vulnerable to personal damage, to the extent that a welfare agency might take protective responsibility

Risk

A measure of the probability of an adverse effect on a population under a well-defined exposure scenario.

risk

[risk]
(engineering)
The potential realization of undesirable consequences from hazards arising from a possible event.

risk

The expectation of loss. It is a function of the probability and the consequences of harm. See risk assessment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cost of failure should be borne by management and its investors, not by those who suffered," Mr.
We can reduce this risk by: reducing the upfront costs of starting a business, providing educational and mentoring resources along the way, and lowering the cost of failure.
As we report in our 'health check' on innovation in the UK dairy industry (p4), the potential cost of failure in establishing new products remains a significant barrier - a fact that's not helped by the current tough economic climate.
The West Midlands clubs are locked in a final-day struggle with Blackpool, Wigan and Blackburn to remain in the richest league in the world - with the cost of failure estimated at pounds 40m-plus.
IT seemed a simple question: what's the cost of failure in a massive Government contract?
Yet the tangible and intangible benefits of adopting new forms of collaboration - reducing the cost of failure, leveraging unused IP and external funding mechanisms, increasing access to networks of talent, and establishing greater trust among patients and other stakeholders - could be extensive.
By improving customer service and reducing the cost of failure, BT has reduced its costs over the last two years.
The report makes clear that the cost of failure would be substantial and felt in every state.
The cost of failure, both financial and in sporting terms, would have been immeasurable on the Gunners, who have consistently competed among the elite clubs of European football for more than a decade.
Now, more than ever, is the time to invest wisely because if organisations think that developing competence is expensive, they should also consider the cost of failure and mistakes.
The reality is too complicated and the cost of failure too devastating to reduce this to a one-source solution.
The government does not assign people to doctors, even though it is possible that people may choose poorly--and health care is an area where the cost of failure can be catastrophic.