risk

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risk

at risk
a. Social welfare vulnerable to personal damage, to the extent that a welfare agency might take protective responsibility

Risk

A measure of the probability of an adverse effect on a population under a well-defined exposure scenario.

risk

[risk]
(engineering)
The potential realization of undesirable consequences from hazards arising from a possible event.

risk

The expectation of loss. It is a function of the probability and the consequences of harm. See risk assessment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Drugs that make it to market have to fund the cost of failure of those that did not make it to the market.
With development times shrinking and the cost of failure rising, getting started quickly is more important than ever.
Joe Morris, chairman of City Growth Liverpool and a director of retailer TJ Morris, said the party learned three valuable lessons: 'First, we have to reduce the cost of failure to encourage start ups.
The cost of failure can be very high, but risks can be minimized by close liaisons and associations with the suppliers (partners) and other similar mills.
One driver behind simulation is the rising cost of failure with traditional experience-based, trial-and-error methods," says John Perdikoulias, president of Compuplast Canada, which supplies B-SIM simulation software.
DAVID MOFFETT will reveal the shocking cost of failure to Welsh rugby has nearly reached an astonishing pounds 100m.
BLACKBURN were taught the cost of failure by the gallant Worthington Cup finalists.
These figures help portray the huge cost of failure to support people with disabilities in postsecondary education programs, both to these individuals as well as to society.
Yet, despite 75 years of cost accounting, some companies still don't understand the real cost of failure and may not recognize the enormous profitability-increasing opportunities this area represents.
The process also can save money and egos because it cuts the cost of failure when workers don't have what the job requires, Behles says.
However, communicators usually can bring their managers and clients to understand that the cost of good research is inexpensive when compared to the cost of failure.