Cotingidae


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Cotingidae

[kō′tin·jə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The cotingas, a family of neotropical suboscine birds in the order Passeriformes.

Cotingidae

 

a family of birds of the order Passeriformes. Members of this family are characterized by the distinctive structure of the lower throat. Several species are capable of producing unusual bell-like, howling, or bellowing sounds. The body measures 10 to 50 cm long. Most species have brilliant plumage. There are approximately 90 species, found in the tropical forests of Central and South America. The birds nest in hollow trees; several species attach their nests to rocks. They feed on fruits, berries, insects, and other invertebrates.

References in periodicals archive ?
Recent phylogenetic studies reveal the Cotingidae is composed of a basal group, the Pipreolinae, and two other large clades; the Cotinginae, and another group which includes subfamilies Rupicolinae and Phytotominae with the genus Carpornis basal to both (Tello et al.
These genera (with exception of Conioptilon) are basal in the Cotingidae phylogeny (Tello et al.
Inconspicuousness is an obvious way to avoid nest predation and, since many Cotingidae nests are very small, it is hypothesized these structures evolved under predation pressures (Snow 1982).
The use of the 'entangle' is known in the Cotingidae (Snow 1982), bur the use of 'velcro' has not been reported before in the family, requiring confirmation by direct observations.
One-parent nesting in Cinnamon-vented Pihas (Lipaugus lanioides, Cotingidae, Tyrannidae).