cottage

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cottage

1. a small simple house, esp in a rural area
2. US and Canadian a small house in the country or at a resort, used for holiday purposes

Cottage

A small rustic country house of the late eighteenth century.

Cottage

 

a single-family, individual residence (either urban or rural) on a small plot of land. Most cottages have two stories and an interior staircase. On the first floor there are usually pantries, a living room, and a kitchen; the bedrooms are on the second floor. After its emergence in England in the late 16th and early 17th century, the cottage became the traditional type of English dwelling. Cottages are also widespread in other European countries (primarily the Scandinavian countries) and in the United States. Most of the cottages in the USSR were built in the 1920's, primarily in new factory settlements.

REFERENCE

Ikonnikov, A. V. Sovremennaia arkhitektura Anglii…. Leningrad, 1958. Pages 125-40.

cottage

1. A relatively small house, often in a village, in the countryside, in a suburb, or at the seashore.
2. A small vacation house.
3. A dwelling, often temporary, that provides only basic shelter.
References in classic literature ?
When they reached the cottage, the two seated themselves with some appearance of fatigue upon the upper step of the porch, facing each other, each leaning against a supporting post.
The cottage, built substantially of grey stone, stood upon the side of the slope, and a broad strip of garden, half cultivated and half wild, began near the house with cabbages, and ended in a jungle of giant bulrushes as it touched the stream.
Nor can they tell why Skim Winsh, who came to his cottage under Dutton Shaw most musically drunk at 10.
Mean- while the howls and roars of her name would go on, making the fishermen strolling upon the sea-wall on the other side of the road turn their heads to- wards the cottages.
Beyond this was the only building in sight, a low conservatory, which seemed far away from anywhere, like a glass cottage standing in its own fields in fairyland.
But I have been examining all the plans for cottages in Loudon's book, and picked out what seem the best things.
The travellers now resumed their walk toward the cottage, which they presently reached.
As soon as morning dawned I crept from my kennel, that I might view the adjacent cottage and discover if I could remain in the habitation I had found.
Occasionally they came upon a cluster of poor cottages, some with a chair or low board put across the open door to keep the scrambling children from the road, others shut up close while all the family were working in the fields.
Now the cottage stood by the edge of a great green forest where the wind was always singing in the branches and the sunshine filtering through the leaves.
In the present instance, it was sickness and poverty together which she came to visit; and after remaining there as long as she could give comfort or advice, she quitted the cottage with such an impression of the scene as made her say to Harriet, as they walked away,
As a house, Barton Cottage, though small, was comfortable and compact; but as a cottage it was defective, for the building was regular, the roof was tiled, the window shutters were not painted green, nor were the walls covered with honeysuckles.