Cotters


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Cotters

 

in the Middle Ages and at the beginning of the modern period in England, a stratum of the feudally dependent peasantry, the holders of the smallest land allotments. References to the cotters date back to the Domesday Book (1086). As the countryside underwent capitalist transformation, the cotters became hired agricultural (or factory) workers.

References in periodicals archive ?
Cotter assumed East Dundees interim director position in October when trustees approved a two-month contract with GovTemps USA, a staffing agency that places professionals in public sector jobs on a temporary basis.
Cotter, whose starting salary is $110,000, said East Dundees small-town charm and close-knit community appealed to him immediately.
Cotter listed about $274,911 in assets in his filing and $762,499 in liabilities.
Cotter also listed $75,000 in lease payments owed on the Struck Cafe's space.
Sundt employs them to advance his reformist points that members of the landowning class needed to be more involved with individuals in the cotter class and to serve as role models for their lessers.