cottonwood

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cottonwood:

see willowwillow,
common name for some members of the Salicaceae, a family of deciduous trees and shrubs of worldwide distribution, especially abundant from north temperate to arctic areas.
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cottonwood

cottonwood

Tall tree, to 150 ft. Name derived from seeds having cottony parachutes. Bark contains salicylin- the same natural aspirin found in willow trees. Inner bark tea used for overall health and well-being.

cottonwood

[′kät·ən‚wu̇d]
(botany)
Any of several poplar trees (Populus) having hairy, encapsulated fruit.
References in periodicals archive ?
no overbank-flooding and inadequate depth to groundwater), we applied minimal large-scale recruitment and replacement of cottonwoods with later successional species of shrub according to current proportions in different river reaches (Howe and Knopf, 1991; Molles et al.
As older cottonwoods die, holes are left in the canopy, and the ecosystem has no new trees to fill them.
Cottonwoods have a special resonance for most Westerners, perhaps because the trees, called alamo in Spanish and commemorated in hundreds of western place names, mark the presence of water and the surprising diversity of life it nourishes in these thirsty landscapes.
So, enjoy cottonwoods where midwesterners do--along waterways and in low, wet places.
Wolves had been reintroduced into the park and central Idaho in the winter of 1995 to 1996, and in 2001 both Ripple and Beschta noticed young willows and cottonwoods were beginning to reach heights unseen for many decades.
Cottonwoods in our area grow to amazing circumferences.
resistance, susceptibility, and/or no differences), we first quantified herbivory on cottonwoods (naturally occurring backcross hybrids of Populus angustifolia X P.
The mammals' chomping helps cottonwoods regenerate and grow in mixed-age stands that promote biodiversity.
The lesser-known cottonwoods from around the United States include fremont cottonwood, also called white cottonwood (Populus fremontii); plains cottonwood, also known as western cottonwood, sweet cottonwood and sargen poplar (Populus deltoides and Populus occidentalis); Rio Grande cottonwood or valley cottonwood (Populus wislizeni); and palmer cottonwood (Populus palmeri).
Olson admits insect and disease controls are not fully understood, but since cottonwoods grow for six years from planting to harvest, there is still time to work on solutions.