countertransference

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countertransference

[¦kau̇nt·ər·tranz′fər·əns]
(psychology)
The conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient, which may interfere with psychotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Donna Orange (1995) goes so far to suggest that perhaps the term counter-transference should be dropped all together, and we should rather refer to the therapist's emotional reaction to the patient as co-transference.
Therefore, a clear depiction of how transference and counter-transference became enacted within the therapeutic arena was insightfully presented.
In other words, analysts are encouraged to pay attention to how their own wounds, vulnerabilities, and desires may be triggered by their analysands' transference of particular feelings onto them in the analytic encounter, since how they subsequently negotiate this counter-transference can either hinder or assist their ability to think about the analysands' circumstances and needs.
Counter-transference is similar to transference, except it happens to the therapist rather than the patient.
The second is looking for counter-transference in the traditional sense of examining the helper's own vulnerabilities and baggage, and this is followed by an initial pastoral assessment of the other's needs.
Winnicott, for example, like all other analysts, employed the technique of interpretation and placed considerable emphasis on transference and counter-transference phenomena.
He details aspects of the child-centered therapist, common challenges, relationships with parents and guardians, and confidentiality; practice issues, including cultural and age considerations, play and activities, emotional development, transference and counter-transference, resilience, relational security, play behavior, motivation for change, therapist gender, and ending therapy; working with children with intellectual and physical disabilities, attachment disorders, mental health disorders, and those who have been adopted, abused, or engage in self-harm; directive and non-directive therapy; play, materials, and dialogue; and professional issues like referrals and communication, boundaries, multi-professional practice, and legal aspects in the UK.
There are myriad boundary violations; intrusion of the therapist's personal neurotic twists and knots; and other disagreeable counter-transference behavior.
It is in rather more experienced professional life that they begin to want supervision to "assist with transference and counter-transference issues and to aid their understanding of the client's and their own responses.
He devotes two full chapters to pharmacotherapy and its complications, including important transference and counter-transference issues, and describes family interventions and therapies, group therapy, individual therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapies, psychodynamic therapies, and future considerations.
Deborah Steinberg, Sharon Dollarhide discussed the issues of counter-transference (ask me what that means) and Prescription drug abuse.