countertransference

(redirected from Counter-transference)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

countertransference

[¦kau̇nt·ər·tranz′fər·əns]
(psychology)
The conscious or unconscious emotional reaction of the therapist to the patient, which may interfere with psychotherapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Donna Orange (1995) goes so far to suggest that perhaps the term counter-transference should be dropped all together, and we should rather refer to the therapist's emotional reaction to the patient as co-transference.
Therefore, a clear depiction of how transference and counter-transference became enacted within the therapeutic arena was insightfully presented.
1999, Counter-transference issues in psychiatric treatment, American Psychiatric Press: Review of Psychiatry, 18, APPI, Washington.
The other 18% listed their concerns regarding how to trust the relationship particularly when counter-transference issues were apparent which may also impact on their professional standing.
Counter-transference and Spectatorship: Searing to Look
The relationships between addiction treatment providers and clients with severe mental illness, and the relationships between mental health service providers and those with severe alcohol and other drug problems, have been characterized by institutionalized counter-transference (e.
Moreover, he argues compellingly that training programs that do not encourage trainees to become aware of their own counter-transference regarding spirituality and religion may hinder therapist development in this area.
41) Judges are to "induce positive transference and avoid negative transference" and should "be sensitive to the possibility of counter-transference on their own part, which can interfere with their ability to develop rapport with the individual, tainting their interactions with the offender.
In the first, she sets out the main points of her argument, and looks at understandings of transference and counter-transference in psychotherapy, pastoral care, and counselling.
Freud's warning about overuse of counter-transference.
One wonders whether Satel is a victim of her own counter-transference when she refers to the mentally ill as "inmates" and psychiatric hospitals as "asylums," or rails against "the cult of the borderline.