Counterweight


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

counterweight

[′kau̇nt·ər‚wāt]
(mechanical engineering)
A device which counterbalances the original load in elevators and skip and mine hoists, going up when the load goes down, so that the engine must only drive against the unbalanced load and overcome friction.
Any weight placed on a mechanism which is out of balance so as to maintain static equilibrium. Also known as counterbalance; counterpoise.

Counterweight

A heavy component used to counterbalance the weight of a movable element; connected either with a cable over a pulley as in elevators or at one end of a lever as in a bascule bridge.

Counterweight

 

(also, counterbalance, counterpoise), a weight used for the complete or partial balancing of forces and moments in machines or their parts. The installation of counterweights on rotating parts, such as crankshafts, can eliminate the harmful effects of centrifugal forces originating from off-center masses.

In metalcutting machine tools, hoists, deep-well plunger pumps, and similar machines with vertically or obliquely moving parts, counterweights reduce the drive power. In hoisting cranes, counterweights provide stability; the arm and weight of the crane’s counterweight are selected to balance the moment of the weight of the mechanisms and metal frame together with half of the moment of a rated load. Counterweights are usually made in the form of a set of pig-iron or concrete bars or slabs.

counterweight

1. A weight that just balances another weight.
2. In a theater stagehouse, a weight (usually of iron, sand, or shot) used to balance suspended scenery, or the like.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you didn't have extra weight to add to the counterweight, you could raise the counterweight to a height of 78 meters to break the record or use a pumpkin with a mass of 1,03 kg.
The word trebuchet, which is used in English to denote a counterweight operated siege machine, originally meant only the largest and most powerful of these machines.
What surprised me was that J of Repair knew exactly how I had bent the counterweight extension arm without me telling him how
For freehand yo-yos, Brown says, it took a lot of experimenting to discover that the best ratio of yo-yo mass to counterweight mass is 7 to 1.
Do we in fact have a new kind of division in Europe, between those in the West anxious for Europe to be a counterweight to the U.
An adviser to Bremer told the press that this appointment was intended to "provide a counterweight to the imams"--that is, the Muslim religious leaders who also have places on the council.
Elijah Price (Samuel L Jackson) provides the counterweight to Willis' recalcitrant disbelief, playing a comic book zealot with his own desperate reasons for needing a superhero.
Women appear in this analysis as having wider non-family and non-kin social networks than men, as constituting more than 40 percent of executors, as more inclined than men to bequeath equally to sons and daughters and to nurture ties to natal kin as a counterweight to their husbands.
Though Net Loss makes for a nice counterweight to the vast body of post-bubble fluff, it's far too ambitious for its own good.
It should be remembered that whether today's large crane, with fulcrum point and counterweight with jib cables, is used, or a timber lever with human counterweights, the same engineering/ mathematical principles apply.
For instance, appointing a "lead director" - an outsider who can marshal the other outsiders and pose a counterweight to the CEO - can lead to a caste system and often has the unintended effect of causing some directors to take a secondary, passive role in board affairs.