Cheshire

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Cheshire

(chĕsh`ər), county, W central England, on the N border with Wales. The county seat was ChesterChester,
city (1991 pop. 80,154), Cheshire West and Chester, W central England, on a sandstone height above the Dee River. It is a railroad junction. Manufactures include electrical equipment, paint, and window panes. Tourism is also important.
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. Other principal population centers included NorthwichNorthwich
, town (1991 pop. 32,664), Cheshire West and Chester, W central England, at the confluence of the Weaver and Dane rivers. Northwich was once the center of England's salt production; however, the manufacture of chemicals has become its leading occupation.
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, CreweCrewe
, town (1991 pop. 59,097), Cheshire East, W central England. It is an important railroad junction with large locomotive and car works, including Rolls-Royce motors.
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, and MacclesfieldMacclesfield
, town (1991 pop. 46,832), Cheshire East, W England. Silk manufacture, of which Macclesfield is the principal center in England, was introduced in the town in 1756. Other manufactures are clothing, shoes, electrical appliances, and paper. The Church of St.
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.

Cheshire was made a palatinate by William I and maintained some of its privileges as such until 1830. The numerous black-and-white-timbered manor houses attest to the county's prosperity in the 16th and 17th cent. Much later, the population of the county greatly increased with the industrialization and suburbanization of the Wirral peninsula and the part of Cheshire just S of Manchester.

In 1974, most of Cheshire became part of the new nonmetropolitan county of Cheshire; NW Cheshire (including BirkenheadBirkenhead,
city (1991 pop. 99,075) and port, Wirral metropolitan borough, W central England, at the mouth of the Mersey River; connected with Liverpool by the Mersey tunnel. Birkenhead has extensive docks. There are engineering, food-processing and clothing plants.
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) became part of the former metropolitan county of MerseysideMerseyside,
former metropolitan county, NW England. Created in the 1974 local government reorganization, the county embraced the Greater Liverpool metropolitan area and comprised five metropolitan districts (metropolitan boroughs): Wirral, Sefton, Liverpool, Knowsley, and St.
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, and NE Cheshire (including StockportStockport,
metropolitan borough (1991 pop. 276,800), W central England, located in the Manchester metropolitan area on the slopes of a narrow valley at the head of the Mersey River. The ravine is crossed by a high railroad viaduct built in the 19th cent.
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) became part of the former metropolitan county of Greater ManchesterGreater Manchester,
former metropolitan county, 497 sq mi (1,288 sq km), W central England. It comprised ten administrative districts (metropolitan boroughs): Bolton, Bury, Manchester, Oldham, Rochdale, Salford, Stockport, Tameside, Trafford, and Wigan.
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. In 1998, Halton and Warrington in N Cheshire became administratively independent of the county. Cheshire was abolished as an administrative county in 2009, but it remains a ceremonial county under the Lieutenancies Act, and its name survives in the unitary authorities of Cheshire East and Cheshire West and Chester.


Cheshire,

town (1990 pop. 25,684), New Haven co., S central Conn., in a farm area; settled 1695, inc. 1780. It is chiefly residential, with some light industry. The painter John Frederick KensettKensett, John Frederick
, 1816–72, American landscape painter, of the Hudson River school, b. Cheshire, Conn. He began painting while working as an engraver and in 1840 went to England to study.
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 was born in Cheshire.

Cheshire

(pop culture)
The highly accomplished international mercenary and assassin Cheshire was introduced in The New Teen Titans Annual #2 (1983) in a story written by Marv Wolfman and rendered by George Pérez, as Jade, an orphan of French-Vietnamese heritage who is doomed to a life of slavery until she murders her master and is unofficially adopted by ex-Blackhawk member Wen Ch'ang. Ch'ang teaches Jade the subtler points of the art of guerilla warfare, including skilled hand-to-hand combat. After she couples this talent with an education in mercenary arts and the craft of poison, which she gains from her brief marriage to Kruen Musenda, the Spitting Cobra, Jade emerges as killer-for-hire Cheshire. The self-determined Cheshire can hold her own in a fight with any hero; as a triple-jointed acrobat she can tangle with—and conquer—the most lithe. She has also been known to conceal poison in her razor-sharp fingernails, giving her that extra edge in combat. She has continually battled the Teen Titans, the all-girl hero group Birds of Prey, and— with fellow vixens the Cheetah and Poison Ivy— Wonder Woman. The wild-haired villainess has led the Ravens, an all-female supervillain team. Never one for maternal instincts, Cheshire gave custody of her daughter Lian to Roy Harper (the hero Arsenal), with whom she had a brief affair. Although she spent time incarcerated while awaiting a crimes-against-humanity charge for detonating a nuclear device in the Middle Eastern country Qurac, in 2005 Cheshire resurfaced in the DC miniseries Villains United, as one of the Secret Six. She had an affair with fellow Sixer Catman and taunted that she might be carrying his child. After betraying her teammates to Lex Luthor's Society, Cheshire took a bullet to the chest courtesy of Deathstroke the Terminator, who remarked, “We don't need any traitors in the Society.”

Cheshire

 

a county in Great Britain. Population, 902,300 (1974). The administrative center of Cheshire is Chester. Cheshire’s main industries are chemicals, nonferrous metallurgy, and machine building. Dairy farming is the chief sector of the county’s agriculture. Cheshire’s industrial centers—Warrington, Widnes, and Runcorn—are situated along the Manchester Canal. Salt is mined in the region.

Cheshire

cat vanishes at will; grin the last feature to go. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]

Cheshire

1
Group Captain (Geoffrey) Leonard. 1917--92, British philanthropist: awarded the Victoria Cross in World War II; founded the Leonard Cheshire Foundation Homes for the Disabled: married Sue, Baroness Ryder

Cheshire

2
a county of NW England: low-lying and undulating, bordering on the Pennines in the east; mainly agricultural: the geographic and ceremonial county includes Warrington and Halton, which became independent unitary authorities in 1998. Administrative centre: Chester. Pop. (excluding unitary authorities): 678 700 (2003 est.). Area (excluding unitary authorites): 2077 sq. km (802 sq. miles)
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