Herefordshire

(redirected from County of Hereford)
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Herefordshire,

county, 842 sq mi (2,181 sq km), W central England, on the Welsh border; adminstratively, it is a unitary authority (since 1998). Herefordshire has an undulating terrain, which reaches its greatest height in the Black Mts. and Malvern Hills. The chief rivers are the Wye, the Teme, and the Frome. The largely agricultural county is famous for its orchards and Hereford cattleHereford cattle
, breed of beef cattle originated in Herefordshire, England, and thought to be descended from the primitive cattle of the country. They are medium-to-large, deep-bodied, thick-fleshed animals with white faces and white markings.
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.

Herefordshire was the scene of border warfare with the Welsh in the Middle Ages, and there are many ruins of castles and fortifications, the most remarkable of which is Offa's DykeOffa's Dyke,
ancient entrenchment of W England and E Wales, from the Dee estuary to near the estuary of the Wye River. It was built in the 8th cent. by Offa, king of Mercia, as a barrier against the Welsh and lies mainly along the England-Wales boundary.
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 (8th cent.). In 1974, Herefordshire was combined with almost all of Worcestershire to form the nonmetropolitan county of Hereford and Worcester, but in 1998 the counties were again separated.

Herefordshire

a county of W England: from 1974 to 1998 part of Hereford and Worcester: drained chiefly by the River Wye; agricultural (esp fruit and cattle). Administrative centre: Hereford. Pop.: 176 900 (2003 est.). Area: 2180 sq. km (842 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Most obviously, as we see from our table, we have three councils with all-out elections: the two unitary councils of Telford & Wrekin and Herefordshire, plus Malvern Hills, which, like Herefordshire, was reconstructed when the former county of Hereford & Worcester was divided.
HEREFORD--Founded in the 1700's by farmers near Herefordshire in the County of Hereford, England, this breed came to the United States in 1817 when famed Kentucky statesman Henry Clay added a Hereford bull and two females to his herd.