Courland Bishopric

Courland Bishopric

 

an episcopate that arose in the southwestern part of Latvia around 1234 through conquest and forcible Christianization of the Kursi tribe. The territory of the Courland Bishopric consisted of three separate parts, the Pil’-tene, Aizpute, and Sakaslei areas, with the holdings of the Livonian Order wedged in between. In the middle of the 16th century, two-thirds of the land belonged to secular vassals. In September 1559, Bishop Johann Münchhausen IV sold the bishopric to the Danish king Frederick II, who passed it on to his brother Magnus. After his death in 1583, a war over the bishopric broke out between Denmark and the Rzecz Pospolita (the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania); in 1585 the bishopric was ceded by Denmark for 30,000 thalers.

References in periodicals archive ?
The instructions sent to Piltene probably envisaged attempts to preserve the neutrality of the Courland Bishopric.
Magnus was sincerely afraid that the Polish administrator in Trans-Dvina Livonia Jan Chodkiewicz might attack the Courland Bishopric on the orders of Sigismund II Augustus.