Court of Exchequer


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Court of Exchequer

 

the highest organ of financial administration in medieval England. It received its name from the checkered cloth that covered the tables in the hall where its members held their sessions. The Court of Exchequer was originally part of the king’s curia. In the 13th century it became a separate finance office headed by the treasurer. At that time the Court of Exchequer was divided into the court proper and the treasury. The members of the court—the barons of the exchequer—exercised control over the financial reports of the king’s officials and conducted judicial examinations of cases affecting the material interests of the crown.

References in periodicals archive ?
granted him permission to appeal the case to the Court of Exchequer.
The judges of the Court of Exchequer were called barons, out of a presumed necessity from a provision in Magna Carta.
Jordan's analysis of the tribute issue offers perhaps the most richly-layered engagement with political discourse in the book, drawing on Scripture, Aquinas, Erasmus, James I, William Fulbecke, and Barnabe Barnes, as well as on a customs case in the court of Exchequer.
Furthermore, what was the significance of the decision not to terminate the customary introduction of the Lord Mayor to the Judges of the Court of Exchequer at Westminster when the passing of the Judicature Act earlier that year had rendered that traditional rite meaningless?
Howe was in the vanguard of the revolutionary movement in North Carolina, clashing with royal Governor Josiah Martin - as a principled patriot, not, as often asserted, because the governor had deprived Howe of his command of Fort Johnston on the Cape Fear River and his office as Baron of the Court of Exchequer in North Carolina.