courtesan

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courtesan

, courtezan
(esp formerly) a prostitute, or the mistress of a man of rank
References in periodicals archive ?
Throughout Clash of the Courtesans these two women take no prisoners and involve multiple individuals who become unwitting pawns in the deadly dance between them.
The Shanghai courtesans were situated on the cutting edge of trends experimenting with Western fashions.
The floating world's rise to prominence gave birth to an outpouring of new artistic production, in the form of paintings and woodblock prints that advertised celebrity courtesans, attracted potential patrons and guided them through the pleasure quarter.
After an Opening exploration of the myth of the courtesan, drawn from classical cultural and literary figures, the book includes chapters on the identification of lechery with syphilis in early English plays; sexual commerce and its consequences in London and Italy; English and Italian pornographic writings; dramatic representations of courtesans; and particular London courtesans who may have been personally known to Shakespeare and his contemporary playwrights.
Moti Chandra, in his study The World of Courtesans (first published in 1976), attempts to provide a compilation of the various kinds of roles played by the courtesan women since the Vedic period.
Following a brief overview of concubines in classical antiquity, Salkeld documents the appearance of courtesans in early modern Italian and English literary and dramatic texts, contrasting them with their real-life counterparts as seen through London court records and Anglo-Italian accounts of tourist encounters with prostitutes in Rome and London.
At the center is the Lotus Palace, home of the most exquisite courtesans in China.
Seven chapters discuss English stage prototypes of the prostitute figure; the operation of bawdy houses and networks of prostitutes in early modern London; representations of courtesans in a work attributed to Pietro Aretino and in the poem The Choice of Valentines by Thomas Nashe; representations of the continental courtesan in Thomas Kyd's The Spanish Tragedy, Christopher Marlowe's The Jew of Malta, and Thomas Heywood's King Edward IV; the lives of courtesans that Shakespeare may reasonably be thought to have known; and the ways in which some dramatists, such as Shakespeare in Measure for Measure, sought to socially redeem the courtesan by converting her into a wife.
Police filed FIR against wife and two of her courtesans whereas investigations are underway.
Long the objects of desire for a nation for thousands of years, concubines and courtesans have long had their place in culture.
Courtesan blogs are written by women who claim to be real-world courtesans or high-end escorts.
Clearly this album was a special, limited edition and, although the photographs bore no names, they were of tawaifs, the famous courtesans from the kothas or upper-storeyed salons of Lucknow.