courtesan

(redirected from Courtesans)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

courtesan

, courtezan
(esp formerly) a prostitute, or the mistress of a man of rank
References in periodicals archive ?
Enjoy some of Paris' greater and lesser known treasures, including a tour of La Paiva mansion, the "love palace" built by one of the most famous courtesans of the Belle Epoque.
Eugenio L Giusti, The Renaissance Courtesan in Words, Letters and Images: Social Amphibology and Moral Framing (A Diachronic Perspective), LED: Milan, 2014; 96 pp.
Noel's humour puts a refreshing feminist spin on nuns who resisted the "intransigent wills" of bishops as well as female courtesans.
His works have two specific characteristics, his large number of book illustrations, on the one hand, and the fact that "Shigemasa concentrated on depicting not the high-class courtesans of the Yoshiwara, but the lower-ranking geisha and female entertainers" on the other hand.
As Bossier demonstrates, courtesans were an essential feature of court entertainment in the newly bureaucratized Northern Song dynasty.
In the introduction (11-14) Giusti considers the example of Veronica Franco and this Venetian courtesan's ability to cross social boundaries, or what he calls her amphibological skill, as an asset of Renaissance courtesans.
Throughout Clash of the Courtesans these two women take no prisoners and involve multiple individuals who become unwitting pawns in the deadly dance between them.
McClure's edited collection, Prostitutes and Courtesans in the Ancient World, broadened the focus of prostitution studies to prostitutes themselves, as dedicators at sanctuaries, as laborers, as owners of prostitutes, and began to look at the effect of prostitution on the citizen body more generally.
The Shanghai courtesans were situated on the cutting edge of trends experimenting with Western fashions.
After an Opening exploration of the myth of the courtesan, drawn from classical cultural and literary figures, the book includes chapters on the identification of lechery with syphilis in early English plays; sexual commerce and its consequences in London and Italy; English and Italian pornographic writings; dramatic representations of courtesans; and particular London courtesans who may have been personally known to Shakespeare and his contemporary playwrights.
Moti Chandra, in his study The World of Courtesans (first published in 1976), attempts to provide a compilation of the various kinds of roles played by the courtesan women since the Vedic period.
Following a brief overview of concubines in classical antiquity, Salkeld documents the appearance of courtesans in early modern Italian and English literary and dramatic texts, contrasting them with their real-life counterparts as seen through London court records and Anglo-Italian accounts of tourist encounters with prostitutes in Rome and London.