Courtesanship


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Courtesanship

Aspasia
mistress of Pericles; byword for cultured courtesan. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 58]
Camille
beautiful courtesan, the toast of Paris. [Fr. Lit.: Camille]
Lais
celebrated Thessalonian courtesan, so beautiful the townswomen kill her out of jealousy. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 561]
Lescaut, Manon
lives well by giving affections to noblemen. [Fr. Lit.: Mahon Lescaut]
Marneffe, Madame
as courtesan for barons, she obtains wealth. [Fr. Lit.: Cousin Bette, Magill I, 166–168]
Phryne
(4th century B.C.) wealthy Athenian hetaera of surpassing beauty. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 784]
Rosette
D’Albert’s pliable, versatile, talented, acknowledged bedmate. [Fr. Lit.: Mademoiselle de Maupin. Magill I, 542–543]
Thaïs
Alexandrian courtesan, converts to Christianity. [Medieval Legend: Walsh Classical, 307]
Vasantasena
lovely courtesan whose many adventures culminate in an edict freeing her from her courtesan status. [Sanskrit Lit.: The Little Clay Cart in Haydn & Fuller, 432]
Violetta
prosperous courtesan in fashionable Paris. [Ital. Opera: Verdi La Traviata in Benét, 1022]
References in periodicals archive ?
26) This seems to have been true for many global courtesan traditions historically: Bonnie Gordon and Martha Feldman refer to the "perilous duet" of music and eros that seems to characterize most traditions of world courtesanship.
In rural areas single women maintain themselves through courtesanship or selling miraa (Dahl, 1979).
In an atmosphere of deceit and roiling lust begins a cavalcade of real and faked murder, courtesanship, brinkmanship and subterfuge, gambling, cheating and shameless mugging.