Chivalric Romance

(redirected from Courtly romance)

Chivalric Romance

 

an epic genre of courtly literature that poeticized knighthood in the figures of such heroes as King Arthur, Lancelot, Tristan, and Amadís. The chivalric romance poeticized the exploits of knights, performed in the name of glory, love, and moral perfection. The genre’s authors included Chrétien de Troyes, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and Thomas Malory (England).

References in periodicals archive ?
To complicate this prevailing dichotomy, the present essay examines Cantwell and Renata's language as it alternates between the registers of courtly romance and carnal desire.
She also traces significant changes in the genre over a fifty-year period, moving from the 'wandering knights' of courtly romance and chivalry exemplified in Sidney's Arcadia, 'errant scholars' peopling Lyly's Euphues and its sequel, emphasizing virtuous action through learning.
Though examining the culture and selected texts of the Occitan (southern French Romance language) troubadour and courtly romance tradition in which characterize love as a paradoxical phenomenon, this study supports the idea that the High Middle Ages (1050-1250 ) represent the beginning of psychoanalytic and other modern/postmodern conceptions of consciousness of the subjective self and the nature of love.
Moreover, these accumulating phrases are drawn directly from the lexical repertoire of the courtly romance, where they typically occur in just this reiterative form.
The courtly romance of the Knight's Tale, the bawdy Miller's Tale and Wife of Bath's Prologue and the shockingly anti-Semitic tale of the "fragrant" Prioress are all given a fresh, modern feel.
The courtly romance of the Knight's Tale, the bawdy Miller's Tale and Wife of Bath's Prologue the shockingly anti-Semitic tale told by the "fragrant" Prioress are all given such a fresh, modern feel that the reader feels people haven't changed much in 600 years.
In the second chapter, for example, she asserts the importance of Neoplatonism for the episode of Alcina's island (and in the following chapter, for the figure of Angelica as well), yet many of the examples that she presents as evidence ("the power of sight to trigger desire," 46, "desire as something a woman perpetrates on her would-be lover," 51) are common tropes in the wider tradition, especially courtly romance and lyric poetry.
The morning after Lancelot's and the Queen's night of lovemaking, Meleagant comes into the queen's bedroom and discovers her bloody sheets--a conventionally loaded sign of sex in the courtly romance, especially the Tristan stories.
This view of language is not confined to the religious text, whose similarity with courtly romance Bloch draws out.
Despite differences in class, race and language (English is a shared middle ground), a courtly romance blossoms, one he takes rather more seriously than she at first.
Thus, the courtly romance had "a pedagogic function"; the genre "put forward an ideal model of the civilised warrior" and was "the single most powerful factor in transmitting ideas of courtesy from the courtier class in which they originated to the lay nobility" (Jaeger 1985: 14).