Couzens, James

Couzens, James

(kŭz`ənz), 1872–1936, U.S. Senator, industrialist, and philanthropist, b. Ontario, Canada. He moved (1887) to Detroit, and after he entered (1903) into partnership with Henry FordFord, Henry,
1863–1947, American industrialist, pioneer automobile manufacturer, b. Dearborn, Mich. The Inception of the Ford Motor Company

Ford showed mechanical aptitude at an early age and left (1879) his father's farm to work as an apprentice in a Detroit
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, he became vice president and general manager of the Ford Motor Company. In 1919 he sold his interests to the Fords for $35 million. As mayor (1919–22) of Detroit, Couzens installed municipal street railways. Serving (1922–36) in the U.S. Senate, he acted with the Progressive Republicans, advocating such measures as high, graduated income taxes and public ownership of utilities. He established the Children's Fund of Michigan with $10 million, gave $1 million for relief in Detroit, and began a loan fund for the physically handicapped. His support of the New Deal cost him (1936) the senatorial renomination.

Bibliography

See biography by H. Barnard (1958).

Couzens, James

(1872–1936) industrialist, U.S. senator, philanthropist; born in Chatham, Ontario, Canada. Moving to Detroit in 1890, he became one of the original investors in Ford's motor company. As general manager of the Ford Motor Company, he was a major factor in the company's early success and he retired a wealthy man in 1915. He was Detroit's mayor from 1918 to 1922. As a Progressive Republican in the U.S. Senate (1922–36), he advocated graduated income taxes and public ownership of utilities. The Republicans denied him renomination in 1936. His philanthropies included hospitals and other medical organizations.
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