Crab pulsar


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Crab pulsar

See Crab nebula.

Crab pulsar

[′krab ′pəl‚sär]
(astronomy)
A pulsar found in the center of the Crab Nebula with a period of about 0.033 second and that emits radiation at all wavelengths from the radio to the x-ray region.
References in periodicals archive ?
It studied the Crab pulsar, 2,000 parsecs (6,500 light-years) away in the constellation Taurus, as an early test of whether it could lock onto X-ray signals.
In a paper published in Nature Astronomy, the team documented the results of their eighteen-month study of the Crab pulsar in the Taurus Constellation and measured the variations of polarisation as this highly magnetised object spins around 30 times every second.
Summary: New Delhi [India], November 7 (ANI): Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on Monday said that the nation's multi-wavelength space telescope AstroSat measured the X-ray polarisation of the Crab pulsar (star) in the Taurus constellation.
As a result, Arecibo is renowned for correctly determining the rotation rate of Mercury (1964), discovering the periodicity of the Crab pulsar (1968) and using its radar facility to provide the first direct image of an asteroid (1989).
The Crab pulsar, for example, emits both giant radio flares (albeit roughly 1/500,000 as powerful as FRB 121102) and is a conspicuous X-ray source, too.
Pulsars emit a steady beat of radio waves, but some young pulsars, such as the nearby Crab pulsar, occasionally blast out vigorous pulses.
et al, (2003) demonstrated resolving of the Crab pulsar light curve with a 2.
Among specific topics are the decomposition of the optical polarization components of the Crab pulsar and its nebula, the analysis of single pulses from radio pulsars at high observing frequencies, the population synthesis of normal radio and gamma-ray pulsars using Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques, symmetry energy effects in the neutron star properties, and radio timing observations of four gamma-ray pulsars at Nanshan.
The observatory, pictured inset, which looks like a garden shed but houses a powerful telescope and other equipment, will be opened on Saturday by astrophysicist Professor Mike Disney, professoremeritusatCardiff university and president of the society Prof Disney discovered the optical component of the Crab Pulsar in 1969.
They have found that the Crab Pulsar - a rotating neutron star at the heart of the Crab Nebula, loved by stargazers around the world - is shedding energy at an alarming rate.
The papers on binary systems include the interplay between diffusion and accretion in nuclear reactions and tidal effects in binaries, while those on compact star systems include reports on the phase-resolved spectra of the crab pulsar and high energy emissions from strange stars.
Among its most significant achievements to date are the discovery of a giant ring around the heart of the Crab Pulsar in the Crab Nebula -- the remains of a stellar explosion; the discovery of the first X-ray flare ever seen from a brown dwarf star; the resolution of the universe's high energy X-ray "glow" into millions of specific light sources; and the first unambiguous detection and X-ray measurement of emission lines associated with gamma ray bursts, mysterious blasts of high-energy radiation thought to be generated by the collapse of massive stars.