cranberry

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cranberry,

low creeping evergreen bogbog,
very old lake without inlet or outlet that becomes acid and is gradually overgrown with a characteristic vegetation (see swamp). Peat moss, or sphagnum, grows around the edge of the open water of a bog (peat is obtained from old bogs) and out on the surface.
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 plant of the genus Oxycoccus of the family Ericaceae (heathheath,
in botany, common name for some members of the Ericaceae, a family of chiefly evergreen shrubs with berry or capsule fruits. Plants of the heath family form the characteristic vegetation of many regions with acid soils, particularly the moors, swamps, and mountain slopes
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 family). Cranberries are considered by some botanists to belong to the blueberry genus Vaccinium. The cultivated species is the native American or large cranberry (O. or V. macrocarpus). The tart red berries are used for sauces, jellies, pies, and beverages. The Massachusetts colonists probably served wild cranberries with turkey at the first harvest feast in 1621, establishing a Thanksgiving tradition. Commercial cultivation began in Massachusetts in the early 19th cent., then in New Jersey and Wisconsin, later in Washington and Oregon and in Canada. United States cranberry acreage now totals c.25,000. Massachusetts leads in production, followed by Wisconsin and New Jersey. Cranberry bogs are flooded to control weeds, to protect against cold, and to facilitate harvesting. Cranberry is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Ericales, family Ericaceae. The high-bush cranberry or cranberry tree, a member of the honeysucklehoneysuckle,
common name for some members of the Caprifoliaceae, a family comprised mostly of vines and shrubs of the Northern Hemisphere, especially abundant in E Asia and E North America.
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 family, is unrelated.

Bibliography

See P. Eck, The American Cranberry (1990).

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cranberry

cranberry

Red tart berries, small leathery shiny oval leaves that stay green year round on wiry stems, white/pink flowers. Used for pleurisy and lung infections. Cranberry may help prevent urinary tract infections, kill viruses and bacteria, prevent kidney stones, soothes rectal disturbances, diarrhea, cystitis. More of a preventative measure than curative. Do not consume if taking Warfarin.

cranberry

[′kran‚ber·ē]
(botany)
Any of several plants of the genus Vaccinium, especially V. macrocarpon, in the order Ericales, cultivated for its small, edible berries.

cranberry

any of several trailing ericaceous shrubs of the genus Vaccinium, such as the European V. oxycoccus, that bear sour edible red berries
References in periodicals archive ?
Cranberries are full of antioxidants, which protect cells from damage by unstable molecules called free radicals.
For a deliciously sweet-tart topping for buckwheat pancakes or oatmeal, simmer fresh cranberries for 10 to 15 minutes in orange juice and a little maple syrup.
In January 2008, the highly respected Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews published a summary of the most authoritative studies done to date on the value of cranberries for preventing UTIs.
Consumers love the great taste and texture that Real Yorkshire Wensleydale with Cranberries offers", said Sandra Bell, marketing manager at The Wensleydale Creamery.
Current evidence has built on earlier research relating to the ability of cranberries to assist urinary tract infections.
With solid science now supporting what tribes deduced through observation, Dr Howell confidently asserts that cranberries are high in unique antioxidants that can reduce oxidative stress on the body.
Also, cranberries became a vital source of vitamin C to prevent scurvy for whalers as well as a food, and an enhancer for other food.
Incorporating cranberries into your diet can be a challenge because of their tartness.
The ripe cranberries float to the surface and are collected in a process called rafting.
Cranberries are as traditional as the golden brown turkey or the kids dressed up like pilgrims for the Thanksgiving play.
Cranberries go with lamb too Tart cranberries are a good foil for the rich flavor of lamb.