crannog

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crannog:

see lake dwellinglake dwelling,
prehistoric habitation built over the shallow waters of a lake shore or a marsh, usually erected on pile-supported platforms, but sometimes on artificial mounds.
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crannog

[′kran·əg]
(archeology)
An artificial island constructed from brushwood, stones, peat, and timber, and usually surrounded by a wooden palisade.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Scottish Crannog Centre at Kenmore, Loch Tay, has constructed a full-size replica to give tourists an insight into old ways.
To find out more about the crannog, open April to October, call the Perthshire tourist board on 01738 627958.
The picturesque village of Kenmore, at the north end of the Loch, is the place to head for sailing, canoeing, water-skiing and fishing, and it is also home to the Scottish Crannog Centre.
Llangorse Lake crannog, pictured right, is an artificial island built in the early medieval period, which was a royal residence for the rulers of the ancient Welsh kingdom of Brycheiniog - roughly equivalent to the old county of Breconshire.
The only known crannog in Wales, it has been slowly eroding for centuries.
Now an eight-week programme of work to consolidate the crannog begins this month, involving experts from Cadw, Brecon Beacons National Park and the National Museums and Galleries of Wales, working with specialist consulting engineering firms.
Once a way of water life: Crannogs are a type of ancient loch-dwelling found throughout Scotland and Ireland, and the one at Llangorse Lake is the only one in Wales.
Throughout their long history crannogs served as farmers' homesteads, status symbols, refuges in times of trouble, hunting and fishing stations, and even holiday residences.
Stone circles and standing stones, crannogs, brochs and duns can be explored, besides Tiree's most intriguing "ancient monument" - the Clach a'choire, or Ringing Stone.
Arrow heads, pottery and ancient human remains have also been discovered at the crannog - a kind of artificial island - which could date back more than 1,000 years.
The Cherrymount link crannog was thought initially to date back to the 14th century but now evidence suggests it went back to early medieval times," the BBC quoted archaeologist Declan Hurl as saying.