Crashaw


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Crashaw

Richard. 1613--49, English religious poet, noted esp for the Steps to the Temple (1646)
References in periodicals archive ?
My first paper, on Crashaw & Herbert, was badly written, I thought, but Blunden said he saw no falling off in skill, and that if anything my exegesis had improved.
Crashaw's women are humble but authoritative, exalted through their song but also limited poetically, and Prakas convincingly outlines all the ways Crashaw minimizes or adapts the potentially Catholic features of their stories to make them less fixed denominationally.
because Crashaw does not believe, or see, finally, that there is a distinction" (196, 197).
Crashaw describes the situation in Cyprus during those years as follows:
In his essay "Richard Crashaw," Arthur quotes three lines from "Wishes" and commends the poet's "cumulative and haunting reiterations" (Reticence 128).
BEST FOOT FORWARD: Coun Alan Farnell, leader of Warwickshire County Council, Louise Wall, Paul Evans of Smith Street Traders Association, Coun Izzi Seccombe and Julie Crashaw
Sung by the Shepherds" Text: (English) from "A Hymn to the Nativity," by Richard Crashaw 4.
PRAZ, Mario The flaming heart: essays on Crashaw, Machiavelli, and other studies in the relations between Italian and English literatures from Chaucer to T.
Metaphysical poets, especially Cowley and Crashaw, and to Shelley, his poetry remains uniquely his.
Despite the once-vaunted secularism of modernity, poets in our time have renewed the age-old congress between poetry and prayer, extending from the Vedas, the Psalms, and the divine odes in Greek tragedy to Rumi's Masnavi, bhakti poetry, and Christian hymns, to the prayer-poems of Herbert, Donne, Vaughan, and Crashaw, to American prayer-poems by Bradstreet and Wheatley, even Dickinson and Whitman.
Among the exceptions is Symphonia: Sum Fluxae Pretium Spei [1993-96], a work for orchestra inspired by a seventeenth-century Latin poem by Richard Crashaw.