Crashaw


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Crashaw

Richard. 1613--49, English religious poet, noted esp for the Steps to the Temple (1646)
References in periodicals archive ?
Rethinking the concept of the grotesque; Crashaw, Baudelaire, Magritte.
In his verse, Crashaw examines "how sacred love transforms human perception and identity, how it perfects or transcends human reason" (Cousins 127).
At the time that Macbeth was being performed, antitheatricalists like the Protestant preacher William Crashaw were calling upon James I to extirpate "the vngodly Playes and Enterludes so rife in this nation.
Doctrine and Devotion in Seventeenth-Century Poetry: Studies in Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, and Vaughan.
Similarly, the Virgin Mary makes a reappearance in "metaphysical" poetry, as does even Teresa of Avila--in the poetry of Richard Crashaw, who eventually went all the way from high Laudianism to Roma.
Crashaw was driven from Cambridge when he became a Catholic in 1645 and took sanctuary in Italy.
Chapters discuss the "gendering" of god in the poetry of Richard Crashaw, representation and embodiment in John Donne's "Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions", representation of the recusant soul in the works of Robert Southwell, and concepts of body, word, and self as written by Thomas Traherne.
In the words of Richard Crashaw, in his Divine Epigrams of 1648: 'Unmoved to see one wretched, is to make him so'.
In addition to an interest in some of Shakespeare's plays, the transaction included Herringman's rights to the poems of Cowley, Crashaw, Denham, Donne, Dryden, Etherege, Shadwell, Suckling, Waller, and certain plays of Beaumont and Fletcher, Davenant, and Jonson.
In a similar vein, Paul Parrish provides an assessment of Richard Crashaw's varied manner in dealing with grief, dividing his poetry into two main approaches: poems from the perspective of a male witness, in which the speaker remains detached from grief; and poems that convey the responses of female mourners (with whom Crashaw identifies) who use poetry as a vehicle for expressing a more genuine grief.
I hate to add anything to Professor Bloom's reading-list, but should he have time to consult the recent anthology Horace in English (Penguin Classics, 1996), he would find that the odes have been translated by Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Sidney, Ben Jonson, Herrick, Milton, Crashaw, Cowley, Dryden, Pope, Samuel Johnson, Wordsworth, Byron, Tennyson, Hopkins, Housman, Kipling (whose "Translation of ode 5.
Crashaw and her staff specialize in resolving severe interpersonal workplace distress.