Crepis


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Related to Crepis: crepitus

Crepis

 

a genus of plants of the family Compositae. The plants are perennial, biennial, or annual tomentose or, less frequently, naked herbs. The stem is 5–150 cm high and bears alternate leaves, which are either dentate, pinnatipartite, pinnatisect, or entire. Infrequently the stem is leafless, and there is only a rosette of leaves at the root. The large or small heads are usually gathered into a corymbose or, less commonly, racemose inflorescence. Sometimes one to five heads are borne by the stem. The involucre is bell-shaped or cylindrical, and the flowers are ligulate, bisexual, and yellow. The achenes have pappus, which is usually white.

There are more than 200 species of Crepis, distributed in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North America. The USSR has 52 species, the most common of which are C. tectorum and C. sibirica. C. tectorum, which is distinguished by small heads, grows among crops and along roads and dwellings. C. sibirica, which has only a few large heads, grows in sparse forests, in meadows, and in mountainous regions with elevations to 2,900 m above sea level. Both species are eaten by farm animals.

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Seed heteromorphism in Crepis sancta (Asteraceae): performance of two morphologies in different environments.
Alternatively, as B-chromosomes in Crepis have been shown to increase the length of the synaptonemal complex (Parker et al.
Geographical variation and genetic analysis of leaf shape in Crepis tectorum (Asteraceae).
Cytogenetic effects of heavy metal ions on Crepis capillaris seeds.
Species good for cutting are Cosmos of all forms, but try Cosmos 'Double Click' and 'Psyche White'; aster, bedding-dahlias, godetia, clarkia, sweet William, Brompton stocks, sunflowers, Rudbeckia hirta 'Kelveden Star', Rudbeckia hirta 'Green Eyes', Rudbeckia hirta 'Prairie Sun', Scabiosa 'Ebony & Ivor', Coreopsis grandiflora 'Early Sunrise' and Mayfield Giant', Sweet-smelling Resedia odorata, Crepis aurea, Gaillardia pulchella, Centaurea cyanus (cornflowers) and Larkspur.
A member of Northumberland Wildlife Trust found five Northern Hawk's-beard, or crepis mollis plants, at one of the Trust's smallest nature reserves, the Williamston Nature Reserve at Slaggyford on the South Tyne.
A member of the dandelion family, Crepis sancta naturally produces two kinds of seeds.
Gustav Vilbaste admits that, although people have reported that arnica was growing in the local forest, they have meant different local plants from such genera as Leontodon, Hieracium, Crepis, Solidago (Vilbaste 1993:174).