Cretan bull


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Cretan bull,

in Greek mythology, giant bull that Hercules captured as his seventh labor. Some versions of the legend state that this bull was the same one that carried Europa to Crete; others claim that it was the beautiful white bull loved by Pasiphaë.

Cretan bull

sacred to Poseidon; sent to Minos. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 68]
See: Bull

Cretan bull

savage bull caught by Hercules as seventh Labor. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Hall, 149]
See: Quarry
References in periodicals archive ?
It was in The Cretan Bull, published in 1947, that she introduced her readers to the pharmacology of atropine.
Only four of the twelve labors are depicted: the Cretan Bull, the Nemean Lion, the Wild Boar of Erymanthus, and the Mares of Diomedes (fig.
Haldane held that Daedalus of Greek mythology was the first biological inventor (the first genetic engineer, we would say) because he was connected with the procreation of the Minotaur through the coupling of Pasiphae and the Cretan bull.
Avrom Fleishman, who considers Mary Renault to be one of the finest historical novelists of the century, thinks that her skill at recreating an ancient sense of the sacred is such that readers are enabled 'to recognize the ritual drama of the Cretan bull dance in the way we recognize our own myths and communal passions'.
Labors of Heracles by Mythical Arrangement Nemean Lion Lernaean Hydra Ceryneian Hind Erymanthian Boar Stables of Augeias Stymphalian Birds Cretan Bull Mares of Diomedes Hippolyte's Girdle Cattle of Geryon Apples of the Hesperides Capture of Cerberus Figure 7.