Creusa


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Related to Creusa: Anchises, Ascanius, Helenus

Creusa

(krēo͞o`sə), in Greek mythology. 1 Daughter of Erechtheus and wife of Xuthus. Her sons, Achaeus by Xuthus, and Ion by Xuthus or Apollo, are the ancestors of the Achaeans and the Ionians. 2 Princess of Corinth: see JasonJason,
in Greek mythology, son of Aeson. When Pelias usurped the throne of Iolcus and killed (or imprisoned) Aeson and most of his descendants, Jason was smuggled off to the centaur Chiron, who reared him secretly on Mt. Pelion.
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 and MedeaMedea
, in Greek mythology, princess of Colchis, skilled in magic and sorcery. She fell in love with Jason and helped him, against the will of her father, Aeëtes, to obtain the Golden Fleece.
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. 3 Daughter of Priam and wife of Aeneas. She died fleeing from Troy.

Creusa

raped by Apollo; bore Janus. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 68]
See: Rape
References in periodicals archive ?
Aeneas could succeed without his wife Creusa because his work was "of arms and the man.
74) Gustavo Augusto Mendonca dos Santos, Suely Creusa Cordeiro de Almeida, "O Clero secular: a formacao de um clero mestico em Pernambuco no seculo XVIII", texto disponivel on-line em: http://www.
Creusa tells nobody about her secret union with Apollo and exposes baby Ion in the cave where she was raped.
He marries into the royal family by wedding Priam's daughter Creusa, the ill-fated mother of Aeneas' own heir Iulus.
1450), portrays Medea as an example of treachery and shamelessness, a beautiful woman who dismembered her brother, killed Jason's wife Creusa, and then killed her own two sons whom Jason had fathered.
When heart-throb Alcmeon returns to ancient Newcastle seeking the son and daughter he abandoned at birth, a web of lies is spun as Queen Creusa, carer of the children, tries to hide the secret that they are not her own.
But as he is greeted by old friends King Creon and Queen Creusa, nothing is as he expects and his return sparks a chain of serious events.
Beyond the facilities themselves, Creusa Takasaki, the manager of Sao Paulo's Admirals Club, believes the lounges personnel helped it tie for the top prize in the LATIN TRADE survey.
Nugent focuses on Creusa, and glosses her sudden and undescribed disappearance during Aeneas' escape from Troy as "a tendency toward incorporealiry" (266).
This is unfortunate in that they provide no extra-textual indication of how the effects, such as the mountain coming between Jason and Creusa, are managed.
However, in a literary "itinerance," Elisabetta is Shakespeare's "Re Lear" (295), Livius's Veturia, Carducci's nonna Lucia from "Davanti san Guido," and Virgil's Creusa from the Aeneid (170).