George Washington Crile

(redirected from Crile arterial forceps)
Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

Crile, George Washington

(krīl), 1864–1943, American surgeon, b. Coshocton co., Ohio, M.D. Univ. of Wooster medical school (later merged with Western Reserve Univ.), 1887. He taught at the Univ. of Wooster (1889–1900) and at Western Reserve Univ. (1900–1924) and was a founder and director (from 1921) of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. He worked on hemorrhage and transfusion, surgery of the thyroid, and shock, developing the technique of anociassociation to prevent surgical shock. His works include Diseases Peculiar to Civilized Man (1934), Phenomena of Life (1936), and Intelligence, Power, and Personality (1941).

Crile, George Washington

(1864–1943) surgeon; born near Chili, Ohio. After taking his medical degree at the University of Wooster (Ohio) and studying in Europe, he taught at Wooster (1889–1900) and then was affiliated with the Western Reserve School of Medicine (Cleveland) (1900–24). He founded the Cleveland Clinic (1921). Interested in the phenomenon of "shock" subsequent to blood loss, he popularized the use of the blood pressure cuff. He demonstrated the importance of measuring peripheral and venous pressures during surgery and developed safer surgical techniques.