Criminal Code

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Criminal Code

 

a codified legislative act establishing the foundations, conditions, and limits of criminal responsibility and providing for the punishment of crimes.

In the USSR the adoption of criminal codes is assigned to the Union republics. Between 1959 and 1961, criminal codes were adopted in all Union republics. The codes correspond to the Basic Principles of Criminal Legislation of the USSR and the Union Republics of 1958 and to other all-Union criminal laws. They also reflect the national characteristics peculiar to the individual republics. The Criminal Code of the RSFSR was adopted on Oct. 27,1960, and put into effect on Jan. 1,1961.

The criminal codes of the Union republics are constructed within a uniform system and are divided into general and special parts. The general part of a criminal code covers its tasks and the bases of criminal responsibility; formulates the concept and basic characteristics of crime and the types of guilt and complicity in a crime; defines the purposes of punishment; and lists the kinds of punishment and the principles and procedure for the assignment of punishment and release from punishment. The special part of the criminal code contains an exhaustive list of socially dangerous acts recognized as criminal and punishable. Its articles list the most important characteristics of specific crimes (the formal element of the definition of the crime) and give the measures of punishment established for commission of the crimes.

References in classic literature ?
The criminal code of every country partakes so much of necessary severity, that without an easy access to exceptions in favor of unfortunate guilt, justice would wear a countenance too sanguinary and cruel.
I incline as little to the sickly feeling which makes every canting lie or maudlin speech of a notorious criminal a subject of newspaper report and general sympathy, as I do to those good old customs of the good old times which made England, even so recently as in the reign of the Third King George, in respect of her criminal code and her prison regulations, one of the most bloody-minded and barbarous countries on the earth.
If you make the criminal code sanguinary, juries will not convict.
the Modern Age (Early 19th century/second half of the 19th century--late 19th century): it is characterized by the predominant application of the penalty of deprivation of liberty, there appear most criminal codes that focus on imprisonment even for minor offenses, thus appearing an "experimental fever" in the organization of prison; 3.
After studying state criminal codes and making an evaluation of the recordkeeping practices in use, the Committee completed a plan for crime reporting that became the foundation of the UCR Program in 1929.
Many of the ratifying countries have already amended their constitutions and criminal codes to implement the ICC Statute, or are in the process of doing so.
But today, 105 nations have eliminated execution from their criminal codes.
When C/B weapons are associated with the criminal intent to violate other criminal statutes, a legal method to seize evidence and make arrests exists, as provided for under various state or federal criminal codes.
But rather than trumpeting a call to arms, Mintz mourns that "all the deterrents and restraints that normally govern our lives--religion, conscience, criminal codes, economic competition, press exposure, social ostracism--have been overwhelmed.
We assure the public and our investors that Starnet has done its best to comply completely with Canadian criminal codes regarding gambling, and has always prevented Canadian and US citizens from online gaming.
In this way, the new Criminal Code falls between modern European criminal codes, regarding life as a primordial value, focusing primarily on its protection and, subsequently, on the protection of other social values.
After studying state criminal codes and making an evaluation of the record-keeping practices in use, the Committee completed a plan for crime reporting that became the foundation of the UCR Program in 1929.