adultery

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adultery

voluntary sexual intercourse between a married man or woman and a partner other than the legal spouse

Adultery

Alcmena
unknowingly commits adultery when Jupiter impersonates her husband. [Rom. Lit.: Amphitryon]
Alison
betrays old husband amusingly with her lodger, Nicholas. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Miller’s Tale”]
Andermatt, Christiane
eventually has child by lover, not husband. [Fr. Lit.: Mont-Oriol, Magill I, 618–620]
Bathsheba
pressured by David to commit adultery during husband’s absence. [O.T.: II Samuel 11:4]
Bloom, Molly
sensual wife of Leopold has an affair with Blazes Boylan. [Irish Lit.: Joyce Ulysses in Magill I, 1040]
Bovary, Emma
acquires lovers to find rapture marriage lacks. [Fr. Lit.: Madame Bovary, Magill I, 539–541]
Brant, Capt. Adam
fatefully falls for general’s wife. [Am. Lit.: Mourning Becomes Electra]
Buchanan, Tom
even with Daisy’s knowledge, deliberately has affairs. [Am. Lit.: The Great Gatsby]
Chatterley, Connie
takes the gameskeeper of her impotent husband as her lover. [Br. Lit.: D. H. Lawrence Lady Chatterley’s Lover in Benét, 559]
Clytemnestra
takes Aegisthus as paramour. [Gk. Lit.: Orestes]
Couples
group of ten husbands sleep with each others’ wives. [Am. Lit.: Weiss, 108]
Cunizza
amours with Sordello while married to first husband. [Br. Lit.: Sordello]
currant
symbol of infidelity. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 398]
de Lamare, Julien
Jeanne’s young philandering husband, who has affairs with her foster-sister and their neighbor’s wife. [Fr. Lit.: Maupassant A Woman’s Life in Magill I, 1127]
Dimmesdale, Rev. Arthur
Puritan minister who commits adultery. [Am. Lit.: Hawthorne The Scarlet Letter]
Guinevere
King Arthur’s unfaithful wife. [Br. Lit.: Le Morte d’Arthur]
Herzog
insatiable husband plays the field. [Am. Lit.: Herzog]
Julia, Donna
Alfonso’s wife; gives herself to Don Juan. [Br. Lit.: “Don Juan” in Magill I, 217–219]
Karenina, Anna
commits adultery with Count Vronsky; scandalizes Russian society. [Russ. Lit.: Anna Karenina]
Lancelot
enters into an adulterous relationship with Guinevere. [Br. Lit.: Malory Le Mort d’Arthur]
Mannon, Christine
conspires with lover to poison husband; discovered, commits suicide. [Am. Lit.: Mourning Becomes Electra]
Moechus
personification of adultery. [Br. Lit.: The Purple Island, Brewer Handbook, 715]
Pozdnishef, Madame
bored with husband, acquires Trukhashevsky as lover. [Russ. Lit.: The Kreutzer Sonata, Magill I, 481–483]
Prynne, Hester
adulterous woman in Puritan New England; condemned to wear a scarlet letter. [Am. Lit.: The Scarlet Letter]
scarlet letter
“A” for “adultery” sewn on Hester Prynne’s dress. [Am. Lit.: The Scarlet Letter]
Tonio
after Nedda’s repulsion, tells husband of her infidelities. [Ital. Opera: Leoncavallo, Pagliacci, Westerman, 341–342]
Wicked Bible
misprint gives Commandment: “Thou shalt commit adultery.” [sic] [Br. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 108]

Adultery

(dreams)
Many people seem to have dreams about committing adultery or about their spouse committing adultery (cheating or being cheated on). In this dictionary there is a definition for cheating and here I will add a few more thoughts about this dream topic. Many dreams come from the private unconscious and are a reflection on thoughts, fears, desires, or issues, or are a response to stressful or anxiety provoking situations. The details of the dream need to be considered before attempting an interpretation. Details such as who is cheating on whom and what are the circumstances surrounding this dream event need to be established. At times people have dreams about cheating on their spouses as a response to a long and monogamous relationship. The dream may be a compensation for boredom, monotony, or unhappiness. On the other hand, the dream could be about you connecting to deeper parts of self, which is represented by a desirable person of the opposite sex. On rare occasions a person may suspect, or feel on some level, that their mate is not faithful but is not willing to admit this consciously. Thus, in the dream state the individual confronts his fears and from there may begin to deal with the situation on a conscious level.
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