apparatus

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apparatus

1. a collection of instruments, machines, tools, parts, or other equipment used for a particular purpose
2. a machine having a specific function
3. Anatomy any group of organs having a specific function

apparatus

[‚ap·ə′rad·əs]
(science and technology)
A compound instrument designed to carry out a specific function.
References in periodicals archive ?
From the point of view of the performer or, indeed, of anyone who turns directly to the score, skipping the introduction (on which more later) and ignoring the ancillary volume of critical apparatus, the opera is--traditionalists of the world, rest assured--thoroughly recognizable.
Generally, the critical apparatus is useful and provides valuable contexts for the letters, particularly for those, the vast majority, which are concerned with financial, legal, or naval technicalities.
By providing a Latin edition and English translation of AElfric's letter, along with an extensive critical apparatus, Jones has made accessible one of the earliest complete English monastic customaries.
Volume one spans the years 1904 to 1918 and features 130 documents in transcript with critical apparatus.
While this discovery and the ensuing critical edition still does not definitively resolve the question of the work's authorship, nor explain the mystery of the more than eighty years between its composition (around 1682) and its first publication in 1768, this new edition is an important updating of Funke's earlier edition (where the critical apparatus was in German).
The volume also features a useful critical apparatus of technical terms and an extensive bibliography.
Introduction, Latin text, translation, notes and index by FRANCIS RUELLO: Introduction and critical apparatus by Jeanne Barbet.
The biographer has done his archival research; we have maps, footnotes, photographs and critical apparatus to prove it, plus an enthusiasm for his subject.
What a pity that he did not adopt the critical apparatus suggested in Bruno Zevi's short contribution and then left high and dry.
His critical apparatus, too, is relatively un-encumbered, ignoring as it does mere orthographical variation between the manuscripts which he has collated.
The work contains complete critical apparatus including a detailed index (which is imperative in a work of this sort), an extensive bibliography, and a biographical register providing a short description of each of Hobbes's correspondents.
In fact, the book, Nadine Gordimer illustrates clearly the virtues and limitations of the use of modern critical apparatus in the assessment of a work of art.

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