apparatus

(redirected from Critical apparatus)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

apparatus

1. a collection of instruments, machines, tools, parts, or other equipment used for a particular purpose
2. a machine having a specific function
3. Anatomy any group of organs having a specific function

apparatus

[‚ap·ə′rad·əs]
(science and technology)
A compound instrument designed to carry out a specific function.
References in periodicals archive ?
The editor's solution, displayed in half-tone, is supported by footnotes, while the critical apparatus provides a full discussion of the issues related to this problematic Sarabande, including all of the editorial emendations.
519-536) supply a technically near-perfect critical apparatus (apart from one or two errors in Arabic transliteration, for example, pp.
The biographer has done his archival research; we have maps, footnotes, photographs and critical apparatus to prove it, plus an enthusiasm for his subject.
What a pity that he did not adopt the critical apparatus suggested in Bruno Zevi's short contribution and then left high and dry.
The title obscures, rather than clarifies, the article's provocative argument that a book's move toward `classic status' inevitably results in the work's erasure, the original text progressively subsumed by the critical apparatus that grows up around it and the representational values that become attached to it.
The book is very readable, uncluttered by critical apparatus and abstract language.
Most commonly used index-based retrieval programs cannot really handle many of the complex features of scholarly texts such as marginalia, the critical apparatus and parallel texts which were discussed earlier in this article.
In both editions, the critical apparatus appears after the score.
A thorough critical apparatus is provided for the diagrams (pp.
This critical edition contains: a succinct historical and literary introduction; clearly explained and well thought-out editorial criteria; the complete transcription of the Dutch text based on the 1550 Antwerp edition; numerous footnotes that point out when the translation does not follow the Spanish original; a critical apparatus that includes the variants in the three later publications of the same translation in 1574, 1580 and 1616; a bibliography and an index of proper names.
Given their rare and considerable talent for rendering this complex work accessible to an Anglophone readership, one can still hope for a complete translation of Il mondo salvato dai ragazzini to become available in the future, accompanied by an extensive critical apparatus which is not limited for reasons of space or intended to favor the potentially restrictive requirements and exigencies of academia.
Delaplace and Champion have, however, given us a scrupulously accurate edition of the 1596 editio princeps, with variants and extensive critical apparatus and commentary.

Full browser ?