critical

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critical

1. Informal so seriously injured or ill as to be in danger of dying
2. Physics of, denoting, or concerned with a state in which the properties of a system undergo an abrupt change
3. go critical (of a nuclear power station or reactor) to reach a state in which a nuclear-fission chain reaction becomes self-sustaining

critical

[′krid·ə·kəl]
(nucleonics)
Capable of sustaining a chain reaction at a constant level.

critical

Essential for continued operations. In risk analysis, one classifies data by the degree of sensitivity and criticality. See sensitive and risk assessment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike his sisters, Stephen moves fluidly across temporal and spatial boundaries in this section, as he witnesses his sisters' suffering, re-enacts his own, and provides critical distance on the stage action through his direct addresses to the audience.
That very admiration, however, leaves very little critical distance between the historian and her subject, something that is vital to any historical research.
Blake suggests that merely by nature of their fictionality the texts he discusses work to create critical distance between reader and subject.
3 are plotted the stress distributions versus the distance r from the concentrator tip, resulting the critical distance L = 1.
Discovering forgotten voices and neglected perspectives can help us to see things differently; and if we can learn, in the authors' words, to read between the lines, Sedgwick may help us gain some critical distance on unexamined assumptions and prevailing norms in our own day.
Always a sympathetic and careful reader of her sources, Manchester maintains the necessary critical distance as she analyzes the cultural values expressed in their letters and autobiographies.
Without critical distance, and without any sense of social and academic responsibility, he acts as a spokesman for his subject, which is ultimately an ultra-liberal market ideology freed from political regulation and academic critique (as there is no need for academic expertise, according to Holtorf).
She also maintained a critical distance from the Democratic Party in which she became involved later in life.
Whether it be attempting to reconstruct the Milan medical milieu with which Leonardo was familiar, or his influence on portraiture drawing on the theory of the four humors, or his tangential connection with early nature printing, the authors treat their subject with the requisite critical distance.
I suggest that, with more time and critical distance, Iris of The Blind Assassin will come to be compared at greater length with the villainesses of Roman and Greek antiquity The figure of Ismene in Sophocles' Antigone strikes me as one fruitful avenue of critical inquiry for future scholars (Cooke, 153-54).
But this also seems to allow him to address critical distance from within traditions.
At the same time, this type of reading takes little critical distance from Deledda as a historical figure.

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