Zeus

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Zeus

(zo͞os), in Greek religion and mythology, son and successor of Kronos as supreme god. His mother, Rhea, immediately after his birth concealed him from Kronos, who, because he was fated to be overthrown by one of his children, ate all his offspring. Rhea gave him a stone wrapped in swaddling clothes which he devoured immediately, not suspecting that the infant Zeus still lived. Later, Zeus tricked Kronos into disgorging his brothers and sisters and led them in a successful revolt against their father (see TitanTitan,
in Greek religion and mythology, one of 12 primeval deities. The female Titan is also called Titaness. The Titans—six sons and six daughters—were the children of Uranus and Gaea.
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). When lots were cast to divide the universe, the underworld went to Hades, the sea to Poseidon, and the heavens and earth to Zeus. Zeus was an amorous god. His first mate was probably Dione, but his official consort was his sister, Hera, who bore him Ares and Hebe. Zeus also loved Themis, Eurynome, Demeter, Mnemosyne, Leto, and Maia and fathered many gods. Famous among his mortal loves were Danaë, Leda, Semele, Thetis, Io, and Europa. His sons sired from mortal wives include Hercules, Dardanus, and Amphitryon. He was also the father of Athena, who was said to have sprung from his head. Supreme among the gods, Zeus, ruling from his court on Mt. Olympus, was the symbol of power, rule, and law. As the father god and the upholder of morality, he rewarded the good and punished the evil. The root meaning of Zeus is "bright" or "sky," and in this sense he was god of weather and fertility. Thus he was worshiped in connection with almost every aspect of life. The most famous weapon of Zeus was the thunderbolt, but, according to some legends, he also possessed the aegisaegis
, in Greek mythology, weapon of Zeus and Athena. It possessed the power to terrify and disperse the enemy or to protect friends. The aegis was usually described as a garment made of goatskin slung over the shoulder or as a piece of armor.
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. The Romans equated Zeus with their own supreme god, Jupiter (or Jove).

Bibliography

See A. B. Cook, Zeus (3 vol., 1914–40).

Enlarge picture
A wood engraving of a giant statue of Zeus, the Greek father of the Gods. From False Gods, by Frank Dobbins, 1873. Reproduced by permission of Fortean Picture Library.

Zeus

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Zeus is both an asteroid and one of the eight hypothetical planets (sometimes referred to as the trans-Neptunian points or planets, or TNPs for short) utilized in Uranian astrology. The Uranian system, sometimes referred to as the Hamburg School of Astrology, was established by Friedrich Sieggrün (1877–1951) and Alfred Witte (1878–1943). It relies heavily on hard aspects and midpoints. In decline for many decades, it has experienced a revival in recent years. As a Uranian planet, Zeus represents the control of strong forces and powers—weapons, anger, willpower, machines, fuel, etc. Although Zeus represents control and restraint, adverse positions of Zeus can also indicate the loss of control.

Based on the speculative orbits of the Uranian planets, the Kepler, Solar Fire and Win*Star software programs will all locate this hypothetical planet in an astrological chart.

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Simms, Maria Kay. Dial Detective: Investigation with the 90 Degree Dial. San Diego: Astro Computing Services, 1989.

Zeus

 

in ancient Greek mythology, the supreme deity and ruler of gods and men. Son of the Titans Cronos and Rhea.

Having overthrown Cronos and the Titans, the gods of the older generation, Zeus yielded his dominion over the sea and the underworld to his brothers Poseidon and Hades. He retained for himself supreme rule over the world and control of all celestial phenomena, primarily thunder and lightning (Zeus the Thunderbolt, Zeus the Cloud Gatherer). Zeus was worshipped as the guardian of the social order and of the family; to him is attributed the establishment of laws and customs. His permanent dwelling place was considered to be Olympus (Zeus the Olympian). Zeus’ symbols were the aegis, the scepter, and sometimes the eagle. As the being who be-stowed victory in war and contests, he was depicted with Nike, the goddess of victory (Roman, Victoria) in his hand. Zeus was considered to be the father of the younger generation of Olympian gods, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Athena, Aphrodite, Hermes, Hephaestus, Dionysus, Hebe, Iris, and Persephone, as well as the muses, graces, and many heroes, including Hercules and Perseus. Many famous aristocratic clans traced their descent from Zeus. The most important places for the worship of Zeus were Dodona (Epirus) and Olympia (Elis), where the Olympian games were held in honor of Zeus. Various episodes from the myth of Zeus are contained in the Iliad, the Odyssey, Hesiod’s Theogony, Apollodorus’Mythological Library, and other ancient works.

In ancient Roman mythology Zeus is identified with Jupiter.

REFERENCE

Cook, A. B. Zeus: A Study in Ancient Religion, vols. 1–3. Cambridge, 1914–40.

M. N. BOTVINNIK

Zeus

in form of a swan, seduces and impregnates Leda. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 149]

Zeus

disguises himself as: satyr to lie with Antiope, Amphitryon with Alcmena, Artemis with Callisto, shower of gold with Danaë, white bull with Europa, swan with Leda, flame of fire with Aegina, and cuckoo with Hera. [Gk. Myth.: Jobes, 1719; New Century, 1158; Zimmerman, 293]

Zeus (Jupiter, Jove)

“Father of the gods and men”; had many legitimate and illegitimate children. [Gk. and Rom. Myth.: Benét, 1115; Bulfinch, Ch. I]

Zeus

disguised as Amphitryon, gives a banquet at the latter’s house. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 32]
See: Feast

Zeus

assumes the appearance of her husband Amphitryon in order to seduce Alcmene. [Fr. Drama: Moliere Amphitryon]

Zeus

the many loves of this god have made his name a byword for sexual lust. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 297–301]
See: Lust

Zeus

supreme of Greek gods; extramarital affairs were count-less. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 292]

Zeus

assumed many forms to indulge his passions. [Zimmerman, 292–293]

Zeus

the supreme god of the ancient Greeks, who became ruler of gods and men after he dethroned his father Cronus and defeated the Titans. He was the husband of his sister Hera and father by her and others of many gods, demigods, and mortals. He wielded thunderbolts and ruled the heavens, while his brothers Poseidon and Hades ruled the sea and underworld respectively

Zeus