cross-sectional study

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cross-sectional study

[¦krȯs ¦sek·shən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of groups of individuals differing on the basis of specified criteria (for example, age) at the same point in time.

cross-sectional study

a method of examining a varied population at one point in time in order to gather data about people at different life stages, or in different circumstances. This method contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which investigate groups over a time period, in order to observe the developmental process, the influence of changing circumstances. The advantage of cross-sectional study is that it is quicker, not dependent on changing resources or research teams, and reduces extraneous variables resulting from the passage of time. The disadvantage is that no account of change can be given.
References in periodicals archive ?
Data source: The cross-sectional analysis comprised almost 3,000 patients.
Data Source: A cross-sectional analysis of the New York State Department of Health database of 146,494 women aged 18 years or older who had undergone benign hysterectomy.
The authors undertook a cross-sectional analysis to look at how frequently unnecessary changes to second- line regimens were made, the patterns of resistance that developed in those on failing first -line antiretroviral treatment and the risk factors for the accumulation of NRTI-associated mutations.
Cross-sectional analysis could be used to specifically examine a solder joint of interest and accurately determine the location of the void.
METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1988-1994) and examined the association between serum 25(OH)D levels and prevalence of CVD in a representative population-based sample of 16,603 men and women aged 18 years or older.
To estimate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in women with pelvic floor disorders and evaluate possible associations, US researchers conducted a cross-sectional analysis of non-pregnant women older than 20 years of age with data on pelvic floor disorders and vitamin D measurements (n=1881).
They conducted a cross-sectional analysis on a subset of about 400 men and women 65 years of age or older who had completed a three-year osteoporosis-intervention trial.
Among his topics are design and sample size issues, the cross-sectional analysis of quality-of-life outcomes, exploring and modelling longitudinal data, economic evaluations, and meta-analysis.
Data for this cross-sectional analysis were drawn from Project EAT (Eating Among Teens)-II, the second wave of a population-based study in Minnesota.
They conducted a cross-sectional analysis on a subset of nearly 400 male and female volunteers aged 65 or older who had completed a 3-year osteoporosis-intervention trial.
Cross-sectional analysis showed good solder joint formation of the QFPs.