cross-sectional study

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Related to Cross-sectional design: Longitudinal design

cross-sectional study

[¦krȯs ¦sek·shən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of groups of individuals differing on the basis of specified criteria (for example, age) at the same point in time.

cross-sectional study

a method of examining a varied population at one point in time in order to gather data about people at different life stages, or in different circumstances. This method contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which investigate groups over a time period, in order to observe the developmental process, the influence of changing circumstances. The advantage of cross-sectional study is that it is quicker, not dependent on changing resources or research teams, and reduces extraneous variables resulting from the passage of time. The disadvantage is that no account of change can be given.
References in periodicals archive ?
Literature on research in foster care have highlighted methodological issues namely the cross-sectional design, comparison group, adult-centric design, sample size and sampling, standardized instrument, male caregivers are left out, and quantitative vs.
Contrary to earlier research, only a few of the more recent studies made use of a cross-sectional design.
Time since injury also varied widely in most of the cross-sectional designs, in some cases, from a few months to up to 30 or 40 years postinjury (Katz et al.
Research findings using a cross-sectional design to examine mood-performance relationships in basketball have been unclear.
Additionally, companies that design complex machinery will benefit from the highly responsive, 3D cross-sectional design environment.
Contract notice: Framework of the implementation of the cross-sectional design of traffic counting system / 2014 contract for traffic data processing system ("forgfer").
Although the cross-sectional design of the study did not allow for causal conclusions or for the measurement of a third causative variable such as neuroticism, the authors concluded that their data were important, because "adequate coping strategies, social support, and the ability to deal with stress can reduce the perceived illness stigma and its serious consequences for patients with SLE.
The cross-sectional design, lack of distinction between free and conjugated BPA in urine samples, and possible unidentified confounding factors are limitations of the study.
The investigators acknowledge several limitations of the study, particularly its cross-sectional design and the potential impact of recall bias, but also note its high response rate and nationally representative sample.
The investigators acknowledged that the study could not address causality because of its cross-sectional design.
The study was limited by its cross-sectional design and by the lack of data on the duration of bisphosphonate use.
Given the limitations of the study, including its cross-sectional design and the possibility that relationship types were misclassified, the analysts acknowledge that "to establish a causal linkage between sexual relationship patterns and STDs, a prospective study designed specifically to gather relationship information up to diagnosis of STD is needed.