cross-sectional study

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cross-sectional study

[¦krȯs ¦sek·shən·əl ′stəd·ē]
(psychology)
The study of groups of individuals differing on the basis of specified criteria (for example, age) at the same point in time.

cross-sectional study

a method of examining a varied population at one point in time in order to gather data about people at different life stages, or in different circumstances. This method contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which investigate groups over a time period, in order to observe the developmental process, the influence of changing circumstances. The advantage of cross-sectional study is that it is quicker, not dependent on changing resources or research teams, and reduces extraneous variables resulting from the passage of time. The disadvantage is that no account of change can be given.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the positive results in cross-sectional studies linking rice consumption with healthier diets, a human clinical trial found that having white or brown rice at a meal increased satiety and feelings of fullness more than a calorically equivalent glucose solution control.
The observed association between higher current concentrations of BPA in both male and female 9-year-olds with higher body fat and obesity levels is consistent with findings from other cross-sectional studies of adults and older children.
This review compared six cohort, before-and-after, and serial cross-sectional studies, from Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, and Nigeria (1,831 women with eclampsia) and two population-based UK studies with results from randomised controlled trials.
Editor's Note: While three cross-sectional studies have found a lower risk of nuclear cataract or their progression in association with higher serum levels or dietary intake of lutein and zeaxanthin, the current study's authors note that a recent FDA review concluded that there was no credible evidence to support a protective effect for lutein or zeaxanthin on cataract risk.
The 4-year longitudinal data revealed a lower persistent remission rate than had been suggested by earlier cross-sectional studies.
They selected randomised trials and cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies carried out in human adults, in which the association between chocolate consumption and the risk of outcomes related to cardiometabolic disorders were reported.
Methodologies utilized in the longitudinal and cross-sectional studies are discussed in chapter 4, followed by a presentation of results in chapter 5 and study summary in chapter 6.
The findings provide further evidence that calls into question the current definition of diabetes, which was based on glycemic thresholds for retinopathy and nephropathy derived from cross-sectional studies conducted in the 1990s.
The evidence is presented through a number of topics reflecting the care pathway and has been categorized into secondary publications (Cochrane systematic reviews, systematic reviews, reviews and meta-analyses), interventional studies (randomized control trials and clinical control trials) and observational studies (cohorts, case control trials, population based cross-sectional studies, comparative studies, qualitative surveys and case reports or series).
These findings are consistent with recent population-based cross-sectional studies in developed countries, which found that early childhood circumcision does not reduce the risk of the common STIs markedly in the general population.
Cross-sectional studies indicate that women are more likely to have recurrence compared to men.
Cross-sectional studies have previously suggested that women with polycystic ovary syndrome, which is characterized by oligomenorrhea and androgen excess, have a high prevalence of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.